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Tired, stressed out kids - meditation could be the key

Tired, stressed out kids - meditation could be the key

January 1, 2018 - By Sam Mann

What if I told you that your child would experience less anxiety and stress if they learned meditation?  

I know it is a bold claim, but given my past 15 years of teaching meditation and showing others how to teach it, I know it is true.

Children are learning to develop mentally, emotionally and physically as they grow older. However if they experience stress, this can have a large impact on this development and interfere with their normal bodily processes.

We may scoff at the idea that children have any less stress than they did 30 or 40 years ago, but the diet our children eat is different and they are more inactive than in the past with the role of technology.

Just like a dog who shakes it off when they have a moment of stress, our children need to move and shake it off if they experience a moment of stress. Instead, the acute moment of stress can turn into a chronic state and this can impact on anxiety levels and produce sleep issues.

How does meditation help?

There are many benefits to teaching children meditation. The first is that it can help them feel calmer and more centred and this can help them recover quickly from stress. Technically speaking it helps to build up their resilience and this is a key skill for adult life where the future can be very uncertain.

It can help nourish the brain pre-sleep and this ‘alpha’ state of being relaxed but alert is what our brain requires to move it into a deeper and longer sleep pattern. Meditation is akin to this alpha state and we have witnessed improvements with sleep within 3 to 4 sessions.

It can help with attention and focus issues. If the brain is stressed it is unable to absorb new information so by given the child skills to help them notice stress and then reduce it through the breath or relaxing the body helps the brain function more effectively.

Rather like creative story telling we can take them on a journey into their imagination which may not only help them to recover for unhelpful thoughts and feelings but can help them enjoy moments of pure joy.

How do I start teaching my child meditation?

First of all, you must start meditation for yourself. There is no point in trying to teach it while your stress levels are sky high. Children feed off our energy and state of mind and if we can’t be grounded for them then they can’t be grounded for us. Like they say in the airplane safety procedures… put your own oxygen mask on first.

This in itself will help you be more mindfully aware and not react to situations provoked by the normal development (tantrums) of children. Plus it can be very helpful if you are not sleeping well either as it can replenish or your energy levels.

Once you have a regular practise, you can start to read or learn about how to teach children meditation. The myth that children can’t learn this is exactly that – a myth. You just need to broaden your horizons when you consider what meditation is.

First of all it may involve mindful movement like yoga as this engages a young person in awareness of their body and helps bring this into balance with the mind and feelings.

Secondly you would want to introduce them to their breath – using tactile ways to help children understand what we mean by the breath and how focussing on the breath can help switch off the stress they are experiencing.

Thirdly we can have fun with meditation. Rather like creative story telling we can take them on a journey into their imagination which may not only help them to recover for unhelpful thoughts and feelings but can help them enjoy moments of pure joy – these thoughts generate a release of important chemicals like oxytocin in the body which is very helpful in reducing stress.

Still unsure your lively child can learn mindfulness?

It is often easier to teach kids than it is to teach adults as they are more willing to engage in their imagination and we can help them be more mindful of their bodies, their breath and their thoughts to reduce stress.

The idea of teaching children this has become very popular in recent years. Worldwide studies are demonstrating how meditation helps to reduce stress and teaching children life-long skills can be a way to help them cope with challenges and change.

Lorraine is the author of ‘Calm Kids – help children relax with mindful activities’ which focusses on helping adults teach their kid some basic steps.  She has also written ‘Connected Kids: Help Kids With Special Needs (and Autism) Shine With Mindful, Heartfelt Activities’.

For more information on meditation for children or teens visit www.teachchildrenmeditation.com

What if I told you that your child would experience less anxiety and stress if they learned meditation?  

I know it is a bold claim, but given my past 15 years of teaching meditation and showing others how to teach it, I know it is true.

Children are learning to develop mentally, emotionally and physically as they grow older. However if they experience stress, this can have a large impact on this development and interfere with their normal bodily processes.

We may scoff at the idea that children have any less stress than they did 30 or 40 years ago, but the diet our children eat is different and they are more inactive than in the past with the role of technology.

Just like a dog who shakes it off when they have a moment of stress, our children need to move and shake it off if they experience a moment of stress. Instead, the acute moment of stress can turn into a chronic state and this can impact on anxiety levels and produce sleep issues.

So how does meditation help?

There are many benefits to teaching children meditation. The first is that it can help them feel calmer and more centred and this can help them recover quickly from stress. Technically speaking it helps to build up their resilience and this is a key skill for adult life where the future can be very uncertain.

It can help nourish the brain pre-sleep and this ‘alpha’ state of being relaxed but alert is what our brain requires to move it into a deeper and longer sleep pattern. Meditation is akin to this alpha state and we have witnessed improvements with sleep within 3 to 4 sessions.

It can help with attention and focus issues. If the brain is stressed it is unable to absorb new information so by given the child skills to help them notice stress and then reduce it through the breath or relaxing the body helps the brain function more effectively.

How do I start teaching my child meditation?

First of all, you must start meditation for yourself. There is no point in trying to teach it while your stress levels are sky high. Children feed off our energy and state of mind and if we can’t be grounded for them then they can’t be grounded for us. Like they say in the airplane safety procedures… put your own oxygen mask on first.

This in itself will help you be more mindfully aware and not react to situations provoked by the normal development (tantrums) of children. Plus it can be very helpful if you are not sleeping well either as it can replenish or your energy levels.

Once you have a regular practise, you can start to read or learn about how to teach children meditation. The myth that children can’t learn this is exactly that – a myth. You just need to broaden your horizons when you consider what meditation is.

First of all it may involve mindful movement like yoga as this engages a young person in awareness of their body and helps bring this into balance with the mind and feelings.

Secondly you would want to introduce them to their breath – using tactile ways to help children understand what we mean by the breath and how focussing on the breath can help switch off the stress they are experiencing.

Thirdly we can have fun with meditation. Rather like creative story telling we can take them on a journey in their imagination which may not only help them to recover for unhelpful thoughts and feelings but can help them enjoy moments of pure joy – these thoughts generate a release of important chemicals like oxytocin in the body which is very helpful in reducing stress.

Still unsure your lively child can learn mindfulness?

As an author on the subject and founder of the Connected Kids Programme, I know so.  

It is often easier to teach kids than it is to teach adults as they are more willing to engage in their imagination and we can help them be more mindful of their bodies, their breath and their thoughts to reduce stress.

The idea of teaching children this has become very popular in recent years. Worldwide studies are demonstrating how meditation helps to reduce stress and teaching children life-long skills can be a way to help them cope with challenges and change.

Lorraine is the author of ‘Calm Kids – help children relax with mindful activities’ which focusses on helping adults teach their kid some basic steps.  She has also written ‘Connected Kids: Help Kids With Special Needs (and Autism) Shine With Mindful, Heartfelt Activities’.

For more information on meditation for children or teens visit www.teachchildrenmeditation.com

What if I told you that your child would experience less anxiety and stress if they learned meditation?  

I know it is a bold claim, but given my past 15 years of teaching meditation and showing others how to teach it, I know it is true.

Children are learning to develop mentally, emotionally and physically as they grow older. However if they experience stress, this can have a large impact on this development and interfere with their normal bodily processes.

We may scoff at the idea that children have any less stress than they did 30 or 40 years ago, but the diet our children eat is different and they are more inactive than in the past with the role of technology.

Just like a dog who shakes it off when they have a moment of stress, our children need to move and shake it off if they experience a moment of stress. Instead, the acute moment of stress can turn into a chronic state and this can impact on anxiety levels and produce sleep issues.

So how does meditation help?

There are many benefits to teaching children meditation. The first is that it can help them feel calmer and more centred and this can help them recover quickly from stress. Technically speaking it helps to build up their resilience and this is a key skill for adult life where the future can be very uncertain.

It can help nourish the brain pre-sleep and this ‘alpha’ state of being relaxed but alert is what our brain requires to move it into a deeper and longer sleep pattern. Meditation is akin to this alpha state and we have witnessed improvements with sleep within 3 to 4 sessions.

It can help with attention and focus issues. If the brain is stressed it is unable to absorb new information so by given the child skills to help them notice stress and then reduce it through the breath or relaxing the body helps the brain function more effectively.

How do I start teaching my child meditation?

First of all, you must start meditation for yourself. There is no point in trying to teach it while your stress levels are sky high. Children feed off our energy and state of mind and if we can’t be grounded for them then they can’t be grounded for us. Like they say in the airplane safety procedures… put your own oxygen mask on first.

This in itself will help you be more mindfully aware and not react to situations provoked by the normal development (tantrums) of children. Plus it can be very helpful if you are not sleeping well either as it can replenish or your energy levels.

Once you have a regular practise, you can start to read or learn about how to teach children meditation. The myth that children can’t learn this is exactly that – a myth. You just need to broaden your horizons when you consider what meditation is.

First of all it may involve mindful movement like yoga as this engages a young person in awareness of their body and helps bring this into balance with the mind and feelings.

Secondly you would want to introduce them to their breath – using tactile ways to help children understand what we mean by the breath and how focussing on the breath can help switch off the stress they are experiencing.

Thirdly we can have fun with meditation. Rather like creative story telling we can take them on a journey in their imagination which may not only help them to recover for unhelpful thoughts and feelings but can help them enjoy moments of pure joy – these thoughts generate a release of important chemicals like oxytocin in the body which is very helpful in reducing stress.

Still unsure your lively child can learn mindfulness?

As an author on the subject and founder of the Connected Kids Programme, I know so.  

It is often easier to teach kids than it is to teach adults as they are more willing to engage in their imagination and we can help them be more mindful of their bodies, their breath and their thoughts to reduce stress.

The idea of teaching children this has become very popular in recent years. Worldwide studies are demonstrating how meditation helps to reduce stress and teaching children life-long skills can be a way to help them cope with challenges and change.

Lorraine is the author of ‘Calm Kids – help children relax with mindful activities’ which focusses on helping adults teach their kid some basic steps.  She has also written ‘Connected Kids: Help Kids With Special Needs (and Autism) Shine With Mindful, Heartfelt Activities’.

For more information on meditation for children or teens visit www.teachchildrenmeditation.com

What if I told you that your child would experience less anxiety and stress if they learned meditation?  

I know it is a bold claim, but given my past 15 years of teaching meditation and showing others how to teach it, I know it is true.

Children are learning to develop mentally, emotionally and physically as they grow older. However if they experience stress, this can have a large impact on this development and interfere with their normal bodily processes.

We may scoff at the idea that children have any less stress than they did 30 or 40 years ago, but the diet our children eat is different and they are more inactive than in the past with the role of technology.

Just like a dog who shakes it off when they have a moment of stress, our children need to move and shake it off if they experience a moment of stress. Instead, the acute moment of stress can turn into a chronic state and this can impact on anxiety levels and produce sleep issues.

So how does meditation help?

There are many benefits to teaching children meditation. The first is that it can help them feel calmer and more centred and this can help them recover quickly from stress. Technically speaking it helps to build up their resilience and this is a key skill for adult life where the future can be very uncertain.

It can help nourish the brain pre-sleep and this ‘alpha’ state of being relaxed but alert is what our brain requires to move it into a deeper and longer sleep pattern. Meditation is akin to this alpha state and we have witnessed improvements with sleep within 3 to 4 sessions.

It can help with attention and focus issues. If the brain is stressed it is unable to absorb new information so by given the child skills to help them notice stress and then reduce it through the breath or relaxing the body helps the brain function more effectively.

How do I start teaching my child meditation?

First of all, you must start meditation for yourself. There is no point in trying to teach it while your stress levels are sky high. Children feed off our energy and state of mind and if we can’t be grounded for them then they can’t be grounded for us. Like they say in the airplane safety procedures… put your own oxygen mask on first.

This in itself will help you be more mindfully aware and not react to situations provoked by the normal development (tantrums) of children. Plus it can be very helpful if you are not sleeping well either as it can replenish or your energy levels.

Once you have a regular practise, you can start to read or learn about how to teach children meditation. The myth that children can’t learn this is exactly that – a myth. You just need to broaden your horizons when you consider what meditation is.

First of all it may involve mindful movement like yoga as this engages a young person in awareness of their body and helps bring this into balance with the mind and feelings.

Secondly you would want to introduce them to their breath – using tactile ways to help children understand what we mean by the breath and how focussing on the breath can help switch off the stress they are experiencing.

Thirdly we can have fun with meditation. Rather like creative story telling we can take them on a journey in their imagination which may not only help them to recover for unhelpful thoughts and feelings but can help them enjoy moments of pure joy – these thoughts generate a release of important chemicals like oxytocin in the body which is very helpful in reducing stress.

Still unsure your lively child can learn mindfulness?

As an author on the subject and founder of the Connected Kids Programme, I know so.  

It is often easier to teach kids than it is to teach adults as they are more willing to engage in their imagination and we can help them be more mindful of their bodies, their breath and their thoughts to reduce stress.

The idea of teaching children this has become very popular in recent years. Worldwide studies are demonstrating how meditation helps to reduce stress and teaching children life-long skills can be a way to help them cope with challenges and change.

Lorraine is the author of ‘Calm Kids – help children relax with mindful activities’ which focusses on helping adults teach their kid some basic steps.  She has also written ‘Connected Kids: Help Kids With Special Needs (and Autism) Shine With Mindful, Heartfelt Activities’.

For more information on meditation for children or teens visit www.teachchildrenmeditation.com

What if I told you that your child would experience less anxiety and stress if they learned meditation?  

 

I know it is a bold claim, but given my past 15 years of teaching meditation and showing others how to teach it, I know it is true.

Children are learning to develop mentally, emotionally and physically as they grow older. However if they experience stress, this can have a large impact on this development and interfere with their normal bodily processes.

We may scoff at the idea that children have any less stress than they did 30 or 40 years ago, but the diet our children eat is different and they are more inactive than in the past with the role of technology.

Just like a dog who shakes it off when they have a moment of stress, our children need to move and shake it off if they experience a moment of stress. Instead, the acute moment of stress can turn into a chronic state and this can impact on anxiety levels and produce sleep issues.

So how does meditation help?

There are many benefits to teaching children meditation. The first is that it can help them feel calmer and more centred and this can help them recover quickly from stress. Technically speaking it helps to build up their resilience and this is a key skill for adult life where the future can be very uncertain.

It can help nourish the brain pre-sleep and this ‘alpha’ state of being relaxed but alert is what our brain requires to move it into a deeper and longer sleep pattern. Meditation is akin to this alpha state and we have witnessed improvements with sleep within 3 to 4 sessions.

It can help with attention and focus issues. If the brain is stressed it is unable to absorb new information so by given the child skills to help them notice stress and then reduce it through the breath or relaxing the body helps the brain function more effectively.

How do I start teaching my child meditation?

First of all, you must start meditation for yourself. There is no point in trying to teach it while your stress levels are sky high. Children feed off our energy and state of mind and if we can’t be grounded for them then they can’t be grounded for us. Like they say in the airplane safety procedures… put your own oxygen mask on first.

This in itself will help you be more mindfully aware and not react to situations provoked by the normal development (tantrums) of children. Plus it can be very helpful if you are not sleeping well either as it can replenish or your energy levels.

Once you have a regular practise, you can start to read or learn about how to teach children meditation. The myth that children can’t learn this is exactly that – a myth. You just need to broaden your horizons when you consider what meditation is.

First of all it may involve mindful movement like yoga as this engages a young person in awareness of their body and helps bring this into balance with the mind and feelings.

Secondly you would want to introduce them to their breath – using tactile ways to help children understand what we mean by the breath and how focussing on the breath can help switch off the stress they are experiencing.

Thirdly we can have fun with meditation. Rather like creative story telling we can take them on a journey in their imagination which may not only help them to recover for unhelpful thoughts and feelings but can help them enjoy moments of pure joy – these thoughts generate a release of important chemicals like oxytocin in the body which is very helpful in reducing stress.

Still unsure your lively child can learn mindfulness?

As an author on the subject and founder of the Connected Kids Programme, I know so.  

It is often easier to teach kids than it is to teach adults as they are more willing to engage in their imagination and we can help them be more mindful of their bodies, their breath and their thoughts to reduce stress.

The idea of teaching children this has become very popular in recent years. Worldwide studies are demonstrating how meditation helps to reduce stress and teaching children life-long skills can be a way to help them cope with challenges and change.

Lorraine is the author of ‘Calm Kids – help children relax with mindful activities’ which focusses on helping adults teach their kid some basic steps.  She has also written ‘Connected Kids: Help Kids With Special Needs (and Autism) Shine With Mindful, Heartfelt Activities’.

For more information on meditation for children or teens visit www.teachchildrenmeditation.com

What if I told you that your child would experience less anxiety and stress if they learned meditation?  

I know it is a bold claim, but given my past 15 years of teaching meditation and showing others how to teach it, I know it is true.

Children are learning to develop mentally, emotionally and physically as they grow older. However if they experience stress, this can have a large impact on this development and interfere with their normal bodily processes.

We may scoff at the idea that children have any less stress than they did 30 or 40 years ago, but the diet our children eat is different and they are more inactive than in the past with the role of technology.

Just like a dog who shakes it off when they have a moment of stress, our children need to move and shake it off if they experience a moment of stress. Instead, the acute moment of stress can turn into a chronic state and this can impact on anxiety levels and produce sleep issues.

So how does meditation help?

There are many benefits to teaching children meditation. The first is that it can help them feel calmer and more centred and this can help them recover quickly from stress. Technically speaking it helps to build up their resilience and this is a key skill for adult life where the future can be very uncertain.

It can help nourish the brain pre-sleep and this ‘alpha’ state of being relaxed but alert is what our brain requires to move it into a deeper and longer sleep pattern. Meditation is akin to this alpha state and we have witnessed improvements with sleep within 3 to 4 sessions.

It can help with attention and focus issues. If the brain is stressed it is unable to absorb new information so by given the child skills to help them notice stress and then reduce it through the breath or relaxing the body helps the brain function more effectively.

How do I start teaching my child meditation?

First of all, you must start meditation for yourself. There is no point in trying to teach it while your stress levels are sky high. Children feed off our energy and state of mind and if we can’t be grounded for them then they can’t be grounded for us. Like they say in the airplane safety procedures… put your own oxygen mask on first.

This in itself will help you be more mindfully aware and not react to situations provoked by the normal development (tantrums) of children. Plus it can be very helpful if you are not sleeping well either as it can replenish or your energy levels.

Once you have a regular practise, you can start to read or learn about how to teach children meditation. The myth that children can’t learn this is exactly that – a myth. You just need to broaden your horizons when you consider what meditation is.

First of all it may involve mindful movement like yoga as this engages a young person in awareness of their body and helps bring this into balance with the mind and feelings.

Secondly you would want to introduce them to their breath – using tactile ways to help children understand what we mean by the breath and how focussing on the breath can help switch off the stress they are experiencing.

Thirdly we can have fun with meditation. Rather like creative story telling we can take them on a journey in their imagination which may not only help them to recover for unhelpful thoughts and feelings but can help them enjoy moments of pure joy – these thoughts generate a release of important chemicals like oxytocin in the body which is very helpful in reducing stress.

Still unsure your lively child can learn mindfulness?

As an author on the subject and founder of the Connected Kids Programme, I know so.  

It is often easier to teach kids than it is to teach adults as they are more willing to engage in their imagination and we can help them be more mindful of their bodies, their breath and their thoughts to reduce stress.

The idea of teaching children this has become very popular in recent years. Worldwide studies are demonstrating how meditation helps to reduce stress and teaching children life-long skills can be a way to help them cope with challenges and change.

Lorraine is the author of ‘Calm Kids – help children relax with mindful activities’ which focusses on helping adults teach their kid some basic steps.  She has also written ‘Connected Kids: Help Kids With Special Needs (and Autism) Shine With Mindful, Heartfelt Activities’.

For more information on meditation for children or teens visit www.teachchildrenmeditation.com

What if I told you that your child would experience less anxiety and stress if they learned meditation?  

I know it is a bold claim, but given my past 15 years of teaching meditation and showing others how to teach it, I know it is true.

Children are learning to develop mentally, emotionally and physically as they grow older. However if they experience stress, this can have a large impact on this development and interfere with their normal bodily processes.

We may scoff at the idea that children have any less stress than they did 30 or 40 years ago, but the diet our children eat is different and they are more inactive than in the past with the role of technology.

Just like a dog who shakes it off when they have a moment of stress, our children need to move and shake it off if they experience a moment of stress. Instead, the acute moment of stress can turn into a chronic state and this can impact on anxiety levels and produce sleep issues.

So how does meditation help?

There are many benefits to teaching children meditation. The first is that it can help them feel calmer and more centred and this can help them recover quickly from stress. Technically speaking it helps to build up their resilience and this is a key skill for adult life where the future can be very uncertain.

It can help nourish the brain pre-sleep and this ‘alpha’ state of being relaxed but alert is what our brain requires to move it into a deeper and longer sleep pattern. Meditation is akin to this alpha state and we have witnessed improvements with sleep within 3 to 4 sessions.

It can help with attention and focus issues. If the brain is stressed it is unable to absorb new information so by given the child skills to help them notice stress and then reduce it through the breath or relaxing the body helps the brain function more effectively.

How do I start teaching my child meditation?

First of all, you must start meditation for yourself. There is no point in trying to teach it while your stress levels are sky high. Children feed off our energy and state of mind and if we can’t be grounded for them then they can’t be grounded for us. Like they say in the airplane safety procedures… put your own oxygen mask on first.

This in itself will help you be more mindfully aware and not react to situations provoked by the normal development (tantrums) of children. Plus it can be very helpful if you are not sleeping well either as it can replenish or your energy levels.

Once you have a regular practise, you can start to read or learn about how to teach children meditation. The myth that children can’t learn this is exactly that – a myth. You just need to broaden your horizons when you consider what meditation is.

First of all it may involve mindful movement like yoga as this engages a young person in awareness of their body and helps bring this into balance with the mind and feelings.

Secondly you would want to introduce them to their breath – using tactile ways to help children understand what we mean by the breath and how focussing on the breath can help switch off the stress they are experiencing.

Thirdly we can have fun with meditation. Rather like creative story telling we can take them on a journey in their imagination which may not only help them to recover for unhelpful thoughts and feelings but can help them enjoy moments of pure joy – these thoughts generate a release of important chemicals like oxytocin in the body which is very helpful in reducing stress.

Still unsure your lively child can learn mindfulness?

As an author on the subject and founder of the Connected Kids Programme, I know so.  

It is often easier to teach kids than it is to teach adults as they are more willing to engage in their imagination and we can help them be more mindful of their bodies, their breath and their thoughts to reduce stress.

The idea of teaching children this has become very popular in recent years. Worldwide studies are demonstrating how meditation helps to reduce stress and teaching children life-long skills can be a way to help them cope with challenges and change.

Lorraine is the author of ‘Calm Kids – help children relax with mindful activities’ which focusses on helping adults teach their kid some basic steps.  She has also written ‘Connected Kids: Help Kids With Special Needs (and Autism) Shine With Mindful, Heartfelt Activities’.

For more information on meditation for children or teens visit www.teachchildrenmeditation.com

What if I told you that your child would experience less anxiety and stress if they learned meditation?  

I know it is a bold claim, but given my past 15 years of teaching meditation and showing others how to teach it, I know it is true.

Children are learning to develop mentally, emotionally and physically as they grow older. However if they experience stress, this can have a large impact on this development and interfere with their normal bodily processes.

We may scoff at the idea that children have any less stress than they did 30 or 40 years ago, but the diet our children eat is different and they are more inactive than in the past with the role of technology.

Just like a dog who shakes it off when they have a moment of stress, our children need to move and shake it off if they experience a moment of stress. Instead, the acute moment of stress can turn into a chronic state and this can impact on anxiety levels and produce sleep issues.

So how does meditation help?

There are many benefits to teaching children meditation. The first is that it can help them feel calmer and more centred and this can help them recover quickly from stress. Technically speaking it helps to build up their resilience and this is a key skill for adult life where the future can be very uncertain.

It can help nourish the brain pre-sleep and this ‘alpha’ state of being relaxed but alert is what our brain requires to move it into a deeper and longer sleep pattern. Meditation is akin to this alpha state and we have witnessed improvements with sleep within 3 to 4 sessions.

It can help with attention and focus issues. If the brain is stressed it is unable to absorb new information so by given the child skills to help them notice stress and then reduce it through the breath or relaxing the body helps the brain function more effectively.

How do I start teaching my child meditation?

First of all, you must start meditation for yourself. There is no point in trying to teach it while your stress levels are sky high. Children feed off our energy and state of mind and if we can’t be grounded for them then they can’t be grounded for us. Like they say in the airplane safety procedures… put your own oxygen mask on first.

This in itself will help you be more mindfully aware and not react to situations provoked by the normal development (tantrums) of children. Plus it can be very helpful if you are not sleeping well either as it can replenish or your energy levels.

Once you have a regular practise, you can start to read or learn about how to teach children meditation. The myth that children can’t learn this is exactly that – a myth. You just need to broaden your horizons when you consider what meditation is.

First of all it may involve mindful movement like yoga as this engages a young person in awareness of their body and helps bring this into balance with the mind and feelings.

Secondly you would want to introduce them to their breath – using tactile ways to help children understand what we mean by the breath and how focussing on the breath can help switch off the stress they are experiencing.

Thirdly we can have fun with meditation. Rather like creative story telling we can take them on a journey in their imagination which may not only help them to recover for unhelpful thoughts and feelings but can help them enjoy moments of pure joy – these thoughts generate a release of important chemicals like oxytocin in the body which is very helpful in reducing stress.

Still unsure your lively child can learn mindfulness?

As an author on the subject and founder of the Connected Kids Programme, I know so.  

It is often easier to teach kids than it is to teach adults as they are more willing to engage in their imagination and we can help them be more mindful of their bodies, their breath and their thoughts to reduce stress.

The idea of teaching children this has become very popular in recent years. Worldwide studies are demonstrating how meditation helps to reduce stress and teaching children life-long skills can be a way to help them cope with challenges and change.

Lorraine is the author of ‘Calm Kids – help children relax with mindful activities’ which focusses on helping adults teach their kid some basic steps.  She has also written ‘Connected Kids: Help Kids With Special Needs (and Autism) Shine With Mindful, Heartfelt Activities’.

For more information on meditation for children or teens visit www.teachchildrenmeditation.com

What if I told you that your child would experience less anxiety and stress if they learned meditation?  

 

I know it is a bold claim, but given my past 15 years of teaching meditation and showing others how to teach it, I know it is true.

Children are learning to develop mentally, emotionally and physically as they grow older. However if they experience stress, this can have a large impact on this development and interfere with their normal bodily processes.

We may scoff at the idea that children have any less stress than they did 30 or 40 years ago, but the diet our children eat is different and they are more inactive than in the past with the role of technology.

Just like a dog who shakes it off when they have a moment of stress, our children need to move and shake it off if they experience a moment of stress. Instead, the acute moment of stress can turn into a chronic state and this can impact on anxiety levels and produce sleep issues.

So how does meditation help?

There are many benefits to teaching children meditation. The first is that it can help them feel calmer and more centred and this can help them recover quickly from stress. Technically speaking it helps to build up their resilience and this is a key skill for adult life where the future can be very uncertain.

It can help nourish the brain pre-sleep and this ‘alpha’ state of being relaxed but alert is what our brain requires to move it into a deeper and longer sleep pattern. Meditation is akin to this alpha state and we have witnessed improvements with sleep within 3 to 4 sessions.

It can help with attention and focus issues. If the brain is stressed it is unable to absorb new information so by given the child skills to help them notice stress and then reduce it through the breath or relaxing the body helps the brain function more effectively.

How do I start teaching my child meditation?

First of all, you must start meditation for yourself. There is no point in trying to teach it while your stress levels are sky high. Children feed off our energy and state of mind and if we can’t be grounded for them then they can’t be grounded for us. Like they say in the airplane safety procedures… put your own oxygen mask on first.

This in itself will help you be more mindfully aware and not react to situations provoked by the normal development (tantrums) of children. Plus it can be very helpful if you are not sleeping well either as it can replenish or your energy levels.

Once you have a regular practise, you can start to read or learn about how to teach children meditation. The myth that children can’t learn this is exactly that – a myth. You just need to broaden your horizons when you consider what meditation is.

First of all it may involve mindful movement like yoga as this engages a young person in awareness of their body and helps bring this into balance with the mind and feelings.

Secondly you would want to introduce them to their breath – using tactile ways to help children understand what we mean by the breath and how focussing on the breath can help switch off the stress they are experiencing.

Thirdly we can have fun with meditation. Rather like creative story telling we can take them on a journey in their imagination which may not only help them to recover for unhelpful thoughts and feelings but can help them enjoy moments of pure joy – these thoughts generate a release of important chemicals like oxytocin in the body which is very helpful in reducing stress.

Still unsure your lively child can learn mindfulness?

As an author on the subject and founder of the Connected Kids Programme, I know so.  

It is often easier to teach kids than it is to teach adults as they are more willing to engage in their imagination and we can help them be more mindful of their bodies, their breath and their thoughts to reduce stress.

The idea of teaching children this has become very popular in recent years. Worldwide studies are demonstrating how meditation helps to reduce stress and teaching children life-long skills can be a way to help them cope with challenges and change.

Lorraine is the author of ‘Calm Kids – help children relax with mindful activities’ which focusses on helping adults teach their kid some basic steps.  She has also written ‘Connected Kids: Help Kids With Special Needs (and Autism) Shine With Mindful, Heartfelt Activities’.

For more information on meditation for children or teens visit www.teachchildrenmeditation.com

What if I told you that your child would experience less anxiety and stress if they learned meditation?  

I know it is a bold claim, but given my past 15 years of teaching meditation and showing others how to teach it, I know it is true.

Children are learning to develop mentally, emotionally and physically as they grow older. However if they experience stress, this can have a large impact on this development and interfere with their normal bodily processes.

We may scoff at the idea that children have any less stress than they did 30 or 40 years ago, but the diet our children eat is different and they are more inactive than in the past with the role of technology.

Just like a dog who shakes it off when they have a moment of stress, our children need to move and shake it off if they experience a moment of stress. Instead, the acute moment of stress can turn into a chronic state and this can impact on anxiety levels and produce sleep issues.

So how does meditation help?

There are many benefits to teaching children meditation. The first is that it can help them feel calmer and more centred and this can help them recover quickly from stress. Technically speaking it helps to build up their resilience and this is a key skill for adult life where the future can be very uncertain.

It can help nourish the brain pre-sleep and this ‘alpha’ state of being relaxed but alert is what our brain requires to move it into a deeper and longer sleep pattern. Meditation is akin to this alpha state and we have witnessed improvements with sleep within 3 to 4 sessions.

It can help with attention and focus issues. If the brain is stressed it is unable to absorb new information so by given the child skills to help them notice stress and then reduce it through the breath or relaxing the body helps the brain function more effectively.

How do I start teaching my child meditation?

First of all, you must start meditation for yourself. There is no point in trying to teach it while your stress levels are sky high. Children feed off our energy and state of mind and if we can’t be grounded for them then they can’t be grounded for us. Like they say in the airplane safety procedures… put your own oxygen mask on first.

This in itself will help you be more mindfully aware and not react to situations provoked by the normal development (tantrums) of children. Plus it can be very helpful if you are not sleeping well either as it can replenish or your energy levels.

Once you have a regular practise, you can start to read or learn about how to teach children meditation. The myth that children can’t learn this is exactly that – a myth. You just need to broaden your horizons when you consider what meditation is.

First of all it may involve mindful movement like yoga as this engages a young person in awareness of their body and helps bring this into balance with the mind and feelings.

Secondly you would want to introduce them to their breath – using tactile ways to help children understand what we mean by the breath and how focussing on the breath can help switch off the stress they are experiencing.

Thirdly we can have fun with meditation. Rather like creative story telling we can take them on a journey in their imagination which may not only help them to recover for unhelpful thoughts and feelings but can help them enjoy moments of pure joy – these thoughts generate a release of important chemicals like oxytocin in the body which is very helpful in reducing stress.

Still unsure your lively child can learn mindfulness?

As an author on the subject and founder of the Connected Kids Programme, I know so.  

It is often easier to teach kids than it is to teach adults as they are more willing to engage in their imagination and we can help them be more mindful of their bodies, their breath and their thoughts to reduce stress.

The idea of teaching children this has become very popular in recent years. Worldwide studies are demonstrating how meditation helps to reduce stress and teaching children life-long skills can be a way to help them cope with challenges and change.

Lorraine is the author of ‘Calm Kids – help children relax with mindful activities’ which focusses on helping adults teach their kid some basic steps.  She has also written ‘Connected Kids: Help Kids With Special Needs (and Autism) Shine With Mindful, Heartfelt Activities’.

For more information on meditation for children or teens visit www.teachchildrenmeditation.com

What if I told you that your child would experience less anxiety and stress if they learned meditation?  

I know it is a bold claim, but given my past 15 years of teaching meditation and showing others how to teach it, I know it is true.

Children are learning to develop mentally, emotionally and physically as they grow older. However if they experience stress, this can have a large impact on this development and interfere with their normal bodily processes.

We may scoff at the idea that children have any less stress than they did 30 or 40 years ago, but the diet our children eat is different and they are more inactive than in the past with the role of technology.

Just like a dog who shakes it off when they have a moment of stress, our children need to move and shake it off if they experience a moment of stress. Instead, the acute moment of stress can turn into a chronic state and this can impact on anxiety levels and produce sleep issues.

So how does meditation help?

There are many benefits to teaching children meditation. The first is that it can help them feel calmer and more centred and this can help them recover quickly from stress. Technically speaking it helps to build up their resilience and this is a key skill for adult life where the future can be very uncertain.

It can help nourish the brain pre-sleep and this ‘alpha’ state of being relaxed but alert is what our brain requires to move it into a deeper and longer sleep pattern. Meditation is akin to this alpha state and we have witnessed improvements with sleep within 3 to 4 sessions.

It can help with attention and focus issues. If the brain is stressed it is unable to absorb new information so by given the child skills to help them notice stress and then reduce it through the breath or relaxing the body helps the brain function more effectively.

How do I start teaching my child meditation?

First of all, you must start meditation for yourself. There is no point in trying to teach it while your stress levels are sky high. Children feed off our energy and state of mind and if we can’t be grounded for them then they can’t be grounded for us. Like they say in the airplane safety procedures… put your own oxygen mask on first.

This in itself will help you be more mindfully aware and not react to situations provoked by the normal development (tantrums) of children. Plus it can be very helpful if you are not sleeping well either as it can replenish or your energy levels.

Once you have a regular practise, you can start to read or learn about how to teach children meditation. The myth that children can’t learn this is exactly that – a myth. You just need to broaden your horizons when you consider what meditation is.

First of all it may involve mindful movement like yoga as this engages a young person in awareness of their body and helps bring this into balance with the mind and feelings.

Secondly you would want to introduce them to their breath – using tactile ways to help children understand what we mean by the breath and how focussing on the breath can help switch off the stress they are experiencing.

Thirdly we can have fun with meditation. Rather like creative story telling we can take them on a journey in their imagination which may not only help them to recover for unhelpful thoughts and feelings but can help them enjoy moments of pure joy – these thoughts generate a release of important chemicals like oxytocin in the body which is very helpful in reducing stress.

Still unsure your lively child can learn mindfulness?

As an author on the subject and founder of the Connected Kids Programme, I know so.  

It is often easier to teach kids than it is to teach adults as they are more willing to engage in their imagination and we can help them be more mindful of their bodies, their breath and their thoughts to reduce stress.

The idea of teaching children this has become very popular in recent years. Worldwide studies are demonstrating how meditation helps to reduce stress and teaching children life-long skills can be a way to help them cope with challenges and change.

Lorraine is the author of ‘Calm Kids – help children relax with mindful activities’ which focusses on helping adults teach their kid some basic steps.  She has also written ‘Connected Kids: Help Kids With Special Needs (and Autism) Shine With Mindful, Heartfelt Activities’.

For more information on meditation for children or teens visit www.teachchildrenmeditation.com

What if I told you that your child would experience less anxiety and stress if they learned meditation?  

I know it is a bold claim, but given my past 15 years of teaching meditation and showing others how to teach it, I know it is true.

Children are learning to develop mentally, emotionally and physically as they grow older. However if they experience stress, this can have a large impact on this development and interfere with their normal bodily processes.

We may scoff at the idea that children have any less stress than they did 30 or 40 years ago, but the diet our children eat is different and they are more inactive than in the past with the role of technology.

Just like a dog who shakes it off when they have a moment of stress, our children need to move and shake it off if they experience a moment of stress. Instead, the acute moment of stress can turn into a chronic state and this can impact on anxiety levels and produce sleep issues.

So how does meditation help?

There are many benefits to teaching children meditation. The first is that it can help them feel calmer and more centred and this can help them recover quickly from stress. Technically speaking it helps to build up their resilience and this is a key skill for adult life where the future can be very uncertain.

It can help nourish the brain pre-sleep and this ‘alpha’ state of being relaxed but alert is what our brain requires to move it into a deeper and longer sleep pattern. Meditation is akin to this alpha state and we have witnessed improvements with sleep within 3 to 4 sessions.

It can help with attention and focus issues. If the brain is stressed it is unable to absorb new information so by given the child skills to help them notice stress and then reduce it through the breath or relaxing the body helps the brain function more effectively.

How do I start teaching my child meditation?

First of all, you must start meditation for yourself. There is no point in trying to teach it while your stress levels are sky high. Children feed off our energy and state of mind and if we can’t be grounded for them then they can’t be grounded for us. Like they say in the airplane safety procedures… put your own oxygen mask on first.

This in itself will help you be more mindfully aware and not react to situations provoked by the normal development (tantrums) of children. Plus it can be very helpful if you are not sleeping well either as it can replenish or your energy levels.

Once you have a regular practise, you can start to read or learn about how to teach children meditation. The myth that children can’t learn this is exactly that – a myth. You just need to broaden your horizons when you consider what meditation is.

First of all it may involve mindful movement like yoga as this engages a young person in awareness of their body and helps bring this into balance with the mind and feelings.

Secondly you would want to introduce them to their breath – using tactile ways to help children understand what we mean by the breath and how focussing on the breath can help switch off the stress they are experiencing.

Thirdly we can have fun with meditation. Rather like creative story telling we can take them on a journey in their imagination which may not only help them to recover for unhelpful thoughts and feelings but can help them enjoy moments of pure joy – these thoughts generate a release of important chemicals like oxytocin in the body which is very helpful in reducing stress.

Still unsure your lively child can learn mindfulness?

As an author on the subject and founder of the Connected Kids Programme, I know so.  

It is often easier to teach kids than it is to teach adults as they are more willing to engage in their imagination and we can help them be more mindful of their bodies, their breath and their thoughts to reduce stress.

The idea of teaching children this has become very popular in recent years. Worldwide studies are demonstrating how meditation helps to reduce stress and teaching children life-long skills can be a way to help them cope with challenges and change.

Lorraine is the author of ‘Calm Kids – help children relax with mindful activities’ which focusses on helping adults teach their kid some basic steps.  She has also written ‘Connected Kids: Help Kids With Special Needs (and Autism) Shine With Mindful, Heartfelt Activities’.

For more information on meditation for children or teens visit www.teachchildrenmeditation.com

What if I told you that your child would experience less anxiety and stress if they learned meditation?  

 

I know it is a bold claim, but given my past 15 years of teaching meditation and showing others how to teach it, I know it is true.

Children are learning to develop mentally, emotionally and physically as they grow older. However if they experience stress, this can have a large impact on this development and interfere with their normal bodily processes.

We may scoff at the idea that children have any less stress than they did 30 or 40 years ago, but the diet our children eat is different and they are more inactive than in the past with the role of technology.

Just like a dog who shakes it off when they have a moment of stress, our children need to move and shake it off if they experience a moment of stress. Instead, the acute moment of stress can turn into a chronic state and this can impact on anxiety levels and produce sleep issues.

So how does meditation help?

There are many benefits to teaching children meditation. The first is that it can help them feel calmer and more centred and this can help them recover quickly from stress. Technically speaking it helps to build up their resilience and this is a key skill for adult life where the future can be very uncertain.

It can help nourish the brain pre-sleep and this ‘alpha’ state of being relaxed but alert is what our brain requires to move it into a deeper and longer sleep pattern. Meditation is akin to this alpha state and we have witnessed improvements with sleep within 3 to 4 sessions.

It can help with attention and focus issues. If the brain is stressed it is unable to absorb new information so by given the child skills to help them notice stress and then reduce it through the breath or relaxing the body helps the brain function more effectively.

How do I start teaching my child meditation?

First of all, you must start meditation for yourself. There is no point in trying to teach it while your stress levels are sky high. Children feed off our energy and state of mind and if we can’t be grounded for them then they can’t be grounded for us. Like they say in the airplane safety procedures… put your own oxygen mask on first.

This in itself will help you be more mindfully aware and not react to situations provoked by the normal development (tantrums) of children. Plus it can be very helpful if you are not sleeping well either as it can replenish or your energy levels.

Once you have a regular practise, you can start to read or learn about how to teach children meditation. The myth that children can’t learn this is exactly that – a myth. You just need to broaden your horizons when you consider what meditation is.

First of all it may involve mindful movement like yoga as this engages a young person in awareness of their body and helps bring this into balance with the mind and feelings.

Secondly you would want to introduce them to their breath – using tactile ways to help children understand what we mean by the breath and how focussing on the breath can help switch off the stress they are experiencing.

Thirdly we can have fun with meditation. Rather like creative story telling we can take them on a journey in their imagination which may not only help them to recover for unhelpful thoughts and feelings but can help them enjoy moments of pure joy – these thoughts generate a release of important chemicals like oxytocin in the body which is very helpful in reducing stress.

Still unsure your lively child can learn mindfulness?

As an author on the subject and founder of the Connected Kids Programme, I know so.  

It is often easier to teach kids than it is to teach adults as they are more willing to engage in their imagination and we can help them be more mindful of their bodies, their breath and their thoughts to reduce stress.

The idea of teaching children this has become very popular in recent years. Worldwide studies are demonstrating how meditation helps to reduce stress and teaching children life-long skills can be a way to help them cope with challenges and change.

Lorraine is the author of ‘Calm Kids – help children relax with mindful activities’ which focusses on helping adults teach their kid some basic steps.  She has also written ‘Connected Kids: Help Kids With Special Needs (and Autism) Shine With Mindful, Heartfelt Activities’.

For more information on meditation for children or teens visit www.teachchildrenmeditation.com

What if I told you that your child would experience less anxiety and stress if they learned meditation?  

I know it is a bold claim, but given my past 15 years of teaching meditation and showing others how to teach it, I know it is true.

Children are learning to develop mentally, emotionally and physically as they grow older. However if they experience stress, this can have a large impact on this development and interfere with their normal bodily processes.

We may scoff at the idea that children have any less stress than they did 30 or 40 years ago, but the diet our children eat is different and they are more inactive than in the past with the role of technology.

Just like a dog who shakes it off when they have a moment of stress, our children need to move and shake it off if they experience a moment of stress. Instead, the acute moment of stress can turn into a chronic state and this can impact on anxiety levels and produce sleep issues.

So how does meditation help?

There are many benefits to teaching children meditation. The first is that it can help them feel calmer and more centred and this can help them recover quickly from stress. Technically speaking it helps to build up their resilience and this is a key skill for adult life where the future can be very uncertain.

It can help nourish the brain pre-sleep and this ‘alpha’ state of being relaxed but alert is what our brain requires to move it into a deeper and longer sleep pattern. Meditation is akin to this alpha state and we have witnessed improvements with sleep within 3 to 4 sessions.

It can help with attention and focus issues. If the brain is stressed it is unable to absorb new information so by given the child skills to help them notice stress and then reduce it through the breath or relaxing the body helps the brain function more effectively.

How do I start teaching my child meditation?

First of all, you must start meditation for yourself. There is no point in trying to teach it while your stress levels are sky high. Children feed off our energy and state of mind and if we can’t be grounded for them then they can’t be grounded for us. Like they say in the airplane safety procedures… put your own oxygen mask on first.

This in itself will help you be more mindfully aware and not react to situations provoked by the normal development (tantrums) of children. Plus it can be very helpful if you are not sleeping well either as it can replenish or your energy levels.

Once you have a regular practise, you can start to read or learn about how to teach children meditation. The myth that children can’t learn this is exactly that – a myth. You just need to broaden your horizons when you consider what meditation is.

First of all it may involve mindful movement like yoga as this engages a young person in awareness of their body and helps bring this into balance with the mind and feelings.

Secondly you would want to introduce them to their breath – using tactile ways to help children understand what we mean by the breath and how focussing on the breath can help switch off the stress they are experiencing.

Thirdly we can have fun with meditation. Rather like creative story telling we can take them on a journey in their imagination which may not only help them to recover for unhelpful thoughts and feelings but can help them enjoy moments of pure joy – these thoughts generate a release of important chemicals like oxytocin in the body which is very helpful in reducing stress.

Still unsure your lively child can learn mindfulness?

As an author on the subject and founder of the Connected Kids Programme, I know so.  

It is often easier to teach kids than it is to teach adults as they are more willing to engage in their imagination and we can help them be more mindful of their bodies, their breath and their thoughts to reduce stress.

The idea of teaching children this has become very popular in recent years. Worldwide studies are demonstrating how meditation helps to reduce stress and teaching children life-long skills can be a way to help them cope with challenges and change.

Lorraine is the author of ‘Calm Kids – help children relax with mindful activities’ which focusses on helping adults teach their kid some basic steps.  She has also written ‘Connected Kids: Help Kids With Special Needs (and Autism) Shine With Mindful, Heartfelt Activities’.

For more information on meditation for children or teens visit www.teachchildrenmeditation.com

What if I told you that your child would experience less anxiety and stress if they learned meditation?  

I know it is a bold claim, but given my past 15 years of teaching meditation and showing others how to teach it, I know it is true.

Children are learning to develop mentally, emotionally and physically as they grow older. However if they experience stress, this can have a large impact on this development and interfere with their normal bodily processes.

We may scoff at the idea that children have any less stress than they did 30 or 40 years ago, but the diet our children eat is different and they are more inactive than in the past with the role of technology.

Just like a dog who shakes it off when they have a moment of stress, our children need to move and shake it off if they experience a moment of stress. Instead, the acute moment of stress can turn into a chronic state and this can impact on anxiety levels and produce sleep issues.

So how does meditation help?

There are many benefits to teaching children meditation. The first is that it can help them feel calmer and more centred and this can help them recover quickly from stress. Technically speaking it helps to build up their resilience and this is a key skill for adult life where the future can be very uncertain.

It can help nourish the brain pre-sleep and this ‘alpha’ state of being relaxed but alert is what our brain requires to move it into a deeper and longer sleep pattern. Meditation is akin to this alpha state and we have witnessed improvements with sleep within 3 to 4 sessions.

It can help with attention and focus issues. If the brain is stressed it is unable to absorb new information so by given the child skills to help them notice stress and then reduce it through the breath or relaxing the body helps the brain function more effectively.

How do I start teaching my child meditation?

First of all, you must start meditation for yourself. There is no point in trying to teach it while your stress levels are sky high. Children feed off our energy and state of mind and if we can’t be grounded for them then they can’t be grounded for us. Like they say in the airplane safety procedures… put your own oxygen mask on first.

This in itself will help you be more mindfully aware and not react to situations provoked by the normal development (tantrums) of children. Plus it can be very helpful if you are not sleeping well either as it can replenish or your energy levels.

Once you have a regular practise, you can start to read or learn about how to teach children meditation. The myth that children can’t learn this is exactly that – a myth. You just need to broaden your horizons when you consider what meditation is.

First of all it may involve mindful movement like yoga as this engages a young person in awareness of their body and helps bring this into balance with the mind and feelings.

Secondly you would want to introduce them to their breath – using tactile ways to help children understand what we mean by the breath and how focussing on the breath can help switch off the stress they are experiencing.

Thirdly we can have fun with meditation. Rather like creative story telling we can take them on a journey in their imagination which may not only help them to recover for unhelpful thoughts and feelings but can help them enjoy moments of pure joy – these thoughts generate a release of important chemicals like oxytocin in the body which is very helpful in reducing stress.

Still unsure your lively child can learn mindfulness?

As an author on the subject and founder of the Connected Kids Programme, I know so.  

It is often easier to teach kids than it is to teach adults as they are more willing to engage in their imagination and we can help them be more mindful of their bodies, their breath and their thoughts to reduce stress.

The idea of teaching children this has become very popular in recent years. Worldwide studies are demonstrating how meditation helps to reduce stress and teaching children life-long skills can be a way to help them cope with challenges and change.

Lorraine is the author of ‘Calm Kids – help children relax with mindful activities’ which focusses on helping adults teach their kid some basic steps.  She has also written ‘Connected Kids: Help Kids With Special Needs (and Autism) Shine With Mindful, Heartfelt Activities’.

For more information on meditation for children or teens visit www.teachchildrenmeditation.com

What if I told you that your child would experience less anxiety and stress if they learned meditation?  

I know it is a bold claim, but given my past 15 years of teaching meditation and showing others how to teach it, I know it is true.

Children are learning to develop mentally, emotionally and physically as they grow older. However if they experience stress, this can have a large impact on this development and interfere with their normal bodily processes.

We may scoff at the idea that children have any less stress than they did 30 or 40 years ago, but the diet our children eat is different and they are more inactive than in the past with the role of technology.

Just like a dog who shakes it off when they have a moment of stress, our children need to move and shake it off if they experience a moment of stress. Instead, the acute moment of stress can turn into a chronic state and this can impact on anxiety levels and produce sleep issues.

So how does meditation help?

There are many benefits to teaching children meditation. The first is that it can help them feel calmer and more centred and this can help them recover quickly from stress. Technically speaking it helps to build up their resilience and this is a key skill for adult life where the future can be very uncertain.

It can help nourish the brain pre-sleep and this ‘alpha’ state of being relaxed but alert is what our brain requires to move it into a deeper and longer sleep pattern. Meditation is akin to this alpha state and we have witnessed improvements with sleep within 3 to 4 sessions.

It can help with attention and focus issues. If the brain is stressed it is unable to absorb new information so by given the child skills to help them notice stress and then reduce it through the breath or relaxing the body helps the brain function more effectively.

How do I start teaching my child meditation?

First of all, you must start meditation for yourself. There is no point in trying to teach it while your stress levels are sky high. Children feed off our energy and state of mind and if we can’t be grounded for them then they can’t be grounded for us. Like they say in the airplane safety procedures… put your own oxygen mask on first.

This in itself will help you be more mindfully aware and not react to situations provoked by the normal development (tantrums) of children. Plus it can be very helpful if you are not sleeping well either as it can replenish or your energy levels.

Once you have a regular practise, you can start to read or learn about how to teach children meditation. The myth that children can’t learn this is exactly that – a myth. You just need to broaden your horizons when you consider what meditation is.

First of all it may involve mindful movement like yoga as this engages a young person in awareness of their body and helps bring this into balance with the mind and feelings.

Secondly you would want to introduce them to their breath – using tactile ways to help children understand what we mean by the breath and how focussing on the breath can help switch off the stress they are experiencing.

Thirdly we can have fun with meditation. Rather like creative story telling we can take them on a journey in their imagination which may not only help them to recover for unhelpful thoughts and feelings but can help them enjoy moments of pure joy – these thoughts generate a release of important chemicals like oxytocin in the body which is very helpful in reducing stress.

Still unsure your lively child can learn mindfulness?

As an author on the subject and founder of the Connected Kids Programme, I know so.  

It is often easier to teach kids than it is to teach adults as they are more willing to engage in their imagination and we can help them be more mindful of their bodies, their breath and their thoughts to reduce stress.

The idea of teaching children this has become very popular in recent years. Worldwide studies are demonstrating how meditation helps to reduce stress and teaching children life-long skills can be a way to help them cope with challenges and change.

Lorraine is the author of ‘Calm Kids – help children relax with mindful activities’ which focusses on helping adults teach their kid some basic steps.  She has also written ‘Connected Kids: Help Kids With Special Needs (and Autism) Shine With Mindful, Heartfelt Activities’.

For more information on meditation for children or teens visit www.teachchildrenmeditation.com

What if I told you that your child would experience less anxiety and stress if they learned meditation?  

 

I know it is a bold claim, but given my past 15 years of teaching meditation and showing others how to teach it, I know it is true.

Children are learning to develop mentally, emotionally and physically as they grow older. However if they experience stress, this can have a large impact on this development and interfere with their normal bodily processes.

We may scoff at the idea that children have any less stress than they did 30 or 40 years ago, but the diet our children eat is different and they are more inactive than in the past with the role of technology.

Just like a dog who shakes it off when they have a moment of stress, our children need to move and shake it off if they experience a moment of stress. Instead, the acute moment of stress can turn into a chronic state and this can impact on anxiety levels and produce sleep issues.

So how does meditation help?

There are many benefits to teaching children meditation. The first is that it can help them feel calmer and more centred and this can help them recover quickly from stress. Technically speaking it helps to build up their resilience and this is a key skill for adult life where the future can be very uncertain.

It can help nourish the brain pre-sleep and this ‘alpha’ state of being relaxed but alert is what our brain requires to move it into a deeper and longer sleep pattern. Meditation is akin to this alpha state and we have witnessed improvements with sleep within 3 to 4 sessions.

It can help with attention and focus issues. If the brain is stressed it is unable to absorb new information so by given the child skills to help them notice stress and then reduce it through the breath or relaxing the body helps the brain function more effectively.

How do I start teaching my child meditation?

First of all, you must start meditation for yourself. There is no point in trying to teach it while your stress levels are sky high. Children feed off our energy and state of mind and if we can’t be grounded for them then they can’t be grounded for us. Like they say in the airplane safety procedures… put your own oxygen mask on first.

This in itself will help you be more mindfully aware and not react to situations provoked by the normal development (tantrums) of children. Plus it can be very helpful if you are not sleeping well either as it can replenish or your energy levels.

Once you have a regular practise, you can start to read or learn about how to teach children meditation. The myth that children can’t learn this is exactly that – a myth. You just need to broaden your horizons when you consider what meditation is.

First of all it may involve mindful movement like yoga as this engages a young person in awareness of their body and helps bring this into balance with the mind and feelings.

Secondly you would want to introduce them to their breath – using tactile ways to help children understand what we mean by the breath and how focussing on the breath can help switch off the stress they are experiencing.

Thirdly we can have fun with meditation. Rather like creative story telling we can take them on a journey in their imagination which may not only help them to recover for unhelpful thoughts and feelings but can help them enjoy moments of pure joy – these thoughts generate a release of important chemicals like oxytocin in the body which is very helpful in reducing stress.

Still unsure your lively child can learn mindfulness?

As an author on the subject and founder of the Connected Kids Programme, I know so.  

It is often easier to teach kids than it is to teach adults as they are more willing to engage in their imagination and we can help them be more mindful of their bodies, their breath and their thoughts to reduce stress.

The idea of teaching children this has become very popular in recent years. Worldwide studies are demonstrating how meditation helps to reduce stress and teaching children life-long skills can be a way to help them cope with challenges and change.

Lorraine is the author of ‘Calm Kids – help children relax with mindful activities’ which focusses on helping adults teach their kid some basic steps.  She has also written ‘Connected Kids: Help Kids With Special Needs (and Autism) Shine With Mindful, Heartfelt Activities’.

For more information on meditation for children or teens visit www.teachchildrenmeditation.com

What if I told you that your child would experience less anxiety and stress if they learned meditation?  

I know it is a bold claim, but given my past 15 years of teaching meditation and showing others how to teach it, I know it is true.

Children are learning to develop mentally, emotionally and physically as they grow older. However if they experience stress, this can have a large impact on this development and interfere with their normal bodily processes.

We may scoff at the idea that children have any less stress than they did 30 or 40 years ago, but the diet our children eat is different and they are more inactive than in the past with the role of technology.

Just like a dog who shakes it off when they have a moment of stress, our children need to move and shake it off if they experience a moment of stress. Instead, the acute moment of stress can turn into a chronic state and this can impact on anxiety levels and produce sleep issues.

So how does meditation help?

There are many benefits to teaching children meditation. The first is that it can help them feel calmer and more centred and this can help them recover quickly from stress. Technically speaking it helps to build up their resilience and this is a key skill for adult life where the future can be very uncertain.

It can help nourish the brain pre-sleep and this ‘alpha’ state of being relaxed but alert is what our brain requires to move it into a deeper and longer sleep pattern. Meditation is akin to this alpha state and we have witnessed improvements with sleep within 3 to 4 sessions.

It can help with attention and focus issues. If the brain is stressed it is unable to absorb new information so by given the child skills to help them notice stress and then reduce it through the breath or relaxing the body helps the brain function more effectively.

How do I start teaching my child meditation?

First of all, you must start meditation for yourself. There is no point in trying to teach it while your stress levels are sky high. Children feed off our energy and state of mind and if we can’t be grounded for them then they can’t be grounded for us. Like they say in the airplane safety procedures… put your own oxygen mask on first.

This in itself will help you be more mindfully aware and not react to situations provoked by the normal development (tantrums) of children. Plus it can be very helpful if you are not sleeping well either as it can replenish or your energy levels.

Once you have a regular practise, you can start to read or learn about how to teach children meditation. The myth that children can’t learn this is exactly that – a myth. You just need to broaden your horizons when you consider what meditation is.

First of all it may involve mindful movement like yoga as this engages a young person in awareness of their body and helps bring this into balance with the mind and feelings.

Secondly you would want to introduce them to their breath – using tactile ways to help children understand what we mean by the breath and how focussing on the breath can help switch off the stress they are experiencing.

Thirdly we can have fun with meditation. Rather like creative story telling we can take them on a journey in their imagination which may not only help them to recover for unhelpful thoughts and feelings but can help them enjoy moments of pure joy – these thoughts generate a release of important chemicals like oxytocin in the body which is very helpful in reducing stress.

Still unsure your lively child can learn mindfulness?

As an author on the subject and founder of the Connected Kids Programme, I know so.  

It is often easier to teach kids than it is to teach adults as they are more willing to engage in their imagination and we can help them be more mindful of their bodies, their breath and their thoughts to reduce stress.

The idea of teaching children this has become very popular in recent years. Worldwide studies are demonstrating how meditation helps to reduce stress and teaching children life-long skills can be a way to help them cope with challenges and change.

Lorraine is the author of ‘Calm Kids – help children relax with mindful activities’ which focusses on helping adults teach their kid some basic steps.  She has also written ‘Connected Kids: Help Kids With Special Needs (and Autism) Shine With Mindful, Heartfelt Activities’.

For more information on meditation for children or teens visit www.teachchildrenmeditation.com

What if I told you that your child would experience less anxiety and stress if they learned meditation?  

I know it is a bold claim, but given my past 15 years of teaching meditation and showing others how to teach it, I know it is true.

Children are learning to develop mentally, emotionally and physically as they grow older. However if they experience stress, this can have a large impact on this development and interfere with their normal bodily processes.

We may scoff at the idea that children have any less stress than they did 30 or 40 years ago, but the diet our children eat is different and they are more inactive than in the past with the role of technology.

Just like a dog who shakes it off when they have a moment of stress, our children need to move and shake it off if they experience a moment of stress. Instead, the acute moment of stress can turn into a chronic state and this can impact on anxiety levels and produce sleep issues.

So how does meditation help?

There are many benefits to teaching children meditation. The first is that it can help them feel calmer and more centred and this can help them recover quickly from stress. Technically speaking it helps to build up their resilience and this is a key skill for adult life where the future can be very uncertain.

It can help nourish the brain pre-sleep and this ‘alpha’ state of being relaxed but alert is what our brain requires to move it into a deeper and longer sleep pattern. Meditation is akin to this alpha state and we have witnessed improvements with sleep within 3 to 4 sessions.

It can help with attention and focus issues. If the brain is stressed it is unable to absorb new information so by given the child skills to help them notice stress and then reduce it through the breath or relaxing the body helps the brain function more effectively.

How do I start teaching my child meditation?

First of all, you must start meditation for yourself. There is no point in trying to teach it while your stress levels are sky high. Children feed off our energy and state of mind and if we can’t be grounded for them then they can’t be grounded for us. Like they say in the airplane safety procedures… put your own oxygen mask on first.

This in itself will help you be more mindfully aware and not react to situations provoked by the normal development (tantrums) of children. Plus it can be very helpful if you are not sleeping well either as it can replenish or your energy levels.

Once you have a regular practise, you can start to read or learn about how to teach children meditation. The myth that children can’t learn this is exactly that – a myth. You just need to broaden your horizons when you consider what meditation is.

First of all it may involve mindful movement like yoga as this engages a young person in awareness of their body and helps bring this into balance with the mind and feelings.

Secondly you would want to introduce them to their breath – using tactile ways to help children understand what we mean by the breath and how focussing on the breath can help switch off the stress they are experiencing.

Thirdly we can have fun with meditation. Rather like creative story telling we can take them on a journey in their imagination which may not only help them to recover for unhelpful thoughts and feelings but can help them enjoy moments of pure joy – these thoughts generate a release of important chemicals like oxytocin in the body which is very helpful in reducing stress.

Still unsure your lively child can learn mindfulness?

As an author on the subject and founder of the Connected Kids Programme, I know so.  

It is often easier to teach kids than it is to teach adults as they are more willing to engage in their imagination and we can help them be more mindful of their bodies, their breath and their thoughts to reduce stress.

The idea of teaching children this has become very popular in recent years. Worldwide studies are demonstrating how meditation helps to reduce stress and teaching children life-long skills can be a way to help them cope with challenges and change.

Lorraine is the author of ‘Calm Kids – help children relax with mindful activities’ which focusses on helping adults teach their kid some basic steps.  She has also written ‘Connected Kids: Help Kids With Special Needs (and Autism) Shine With Mindful, Heartfelt Activities’.

For more information on meditation for children or teens visit www.teachchildrenmeditation.com

What if I told you that your child would experience less anxiety and stress if they learned meditation?  

I know it is a bold claim, but given my past 15 years of teaching meditation and showing others how to teach it, I know it is true.

Children are learning to develop mentally, emotionally and physically as they grow older. However if they experience stress, this can have a large impact on this development and interfere with their normal bodily processes.

We may scoff at the idea that children have any less stress than they did 30 or 40 years ago, but the diet our children eat is different and they are more inactive than in the past with the role of technology.

Just like a dog who shakes it off when they have a moment of stress, our children need to move and shake it off if they experience a moment of stress. Instead, the acute moment of stress can turn into a chronic state and this can impact on anxiety levels and produce sleep issues.

So how does meditation help?

There are many benefits to teaching children meditation. The first is that it can help them feel calmer and more centred and this can help them recover quickly from stress. Technically speaking it helps to build up their resilience and this is a key skill for adult life where the future can be very uncertain.

It can help nourish the brain pre-sleep and this ‘alpha’ state of being relaxed but alert is what our brain requires to move it into a deeper and longer sleep pattern. Meditation is akin to this alpha state and we have witnessed improvements with sleep within 3 to 4 sessions.

It can help with attention and focus issues. If the brain is stressed it is unable to absorb new information so by given the child skills to help them notice stress and then reduce it through the breath or relaxing the body helps the brain function more effectively.

How do I start teaching my child meditation?

First of all, you must start meditation for yourself. There is no point in trying to teach it while your stress levels are sky high. Children feed off our energy and state of mind and if we can’t be grounded for them then they can’t be grounded for us. Like they say in the airplane safety procedures… put your own oxygen mask on first.

This in itself will help you be more mindfully aware and not react to situations provoked by the normal development (tantrums) of children. Plus it can be very helpful if you are not sleeping well either as it can replenish or your energy levels.

Once you have a regular practise, you can start to read or learn about how to teach children meditation. The myth that children can’t learn this is exactly that – a myth. You just need to broaden your horizons when you consider what meditation is.

First of all it may involve mindful movement like yoga as this engages a young person in awareness of their body and helps bring this into balance with the mind and feelings.

Secondly you would want to introduce them to their breath – using tactile ways to help children understand what we mean by the breath and how focussing on the breath can help switch off the stress they are experiencing.

Thirdly we can have fun with meditation. Rather like creative story telling we can take them on a journey in their imagination which may not only help them to recover for unhelpful thoughts and feelings but can help them enjoy moments of pure joy – these thoughts generate a release of important chemicals like oxytocin in the body which is very helpful in reducing stress.

Still unsure your lively child can learn mindfulness?

As an author on the subject and founder of the Connected Kids Programme, I know so.  

It is often easier to teach kids than it is to teach adults as they are more willing to engage in their imagination and we can help them be more mindful of their bodies, their breath and their thoughts to reduce stress.

The idea of teaching children this has become very popular in recent years. Worldwide studies are demonstrating how meditation helps to reduce stress and teaching children life-long skills can be a way to help them cope with challenges and change.

Lorraine is the author of ‘Calm Kids – help children relax with mindful activities’ which focusses on helping adults teach their kid some basic steps.  She has also written ‘Connected Kids: Help Kids With Special Needs (and Autism) Shine With Mindful, Heartfelt Activities’.

For more information on meditation for children or teens visit www.teachchildrenmeditation.com

What if I told you that your child would experience less anxiety and stress if they learned meditation?  

 

I know it is a bold claim, but given my past 15 years of teaching meditation and showing others how to teach it, I know it is true.

Children are learning to develop mentally, emotionally and physically as they grow older. However if they experience stress, this can have a large impact on this development and interfere with their normal bodily processes.

We may scoff at the idea that children have any less stress than they did 30 or 40 years ago, but the diet our children eat is different and they are more inactive than in the past with the role of technology.

Just like a dog who shakes it off when they have a moment of stress, our children need to move and shake it off if they experience a moment of stress. Instead, the acute moment of stress can turn into a chronic state and this can impact on anxiety levels and produce sleep issues.

So how does meditation help?

There are many benefits to teaching children meditation. The first is that it can help them feel calmer and more centred and this can help them recover quickly from stress. Technically speaking it helps to build up their resilience and this is a key skill for adult life where the future can be very uncertain.

It can help nourish the brain pre-sleep and this ‘alpha’ state of being relaxed but alert is what our brain requires to move it into a deeper and longer sleep pattern. Meditation is akin to this alpha state and we have witnessed improvements with sleep within 3 to 4 sessions.

It can help with attention and focus issues. If the brain is stressed it is unable to absorb new information so by given the child skills to help them notice stress and then reduce it through the breath or relaxing the body helps the brain function more effectively.

How do I start teaching my child meditation?

First of all, you must start meditation for yourself. There is no point in trying to teach it while your stress levels are sky high. Children feed off our energy and state of mind and if we can’t be grounded for them then they can’t be grounded for us. Like they say in the airplane safety procedures… put your own oxygen mask on first.

This in itself will help you be more mindfully aware and not react to situations provoked by the normal development (tantrums) of children. Plus it can be very helpful if you are not sleeping well either as it can replenish or your energy levels.

Once you have a regular practise, you can start to read or learn about how to teach children meditation. The myth that children can’t learn this is exactly that – a myth. You just need to broaden your horizons when you consider what meditation is.

First of all it may involve mindful movement like yoga as this engages a young person in awareness of their body and helps bring this into balance with the mind and feelings.

Secondly you would want to introduce them to their breath – using tactile ways to help children understand what we mean by the breath and how focussing on the breath can help switch off the stress they are experiencing.

Thirdly we can have fun with meditation. Rather like creative story telling we can take them on a journey in their imagination which may not only help them to recover for unhelpful thoughts and feelings but can help them enjoy moments of pure joy – these thoughts generate a release of important chemicals like oxytocin in the body which is very helpful in reducing stress.

Still unsure your lively child can learn mindfulness?

As an author on the subject and founder of the Connected Kids Programme, I know so.  

It is often easier to teach kids than it is to teach adults as they are more willing to engage in their imagination and we can help them be more mindful of their bodies, their breath and their thoughts to reduce stress.

The idea of teaching children this has become very popular in recent years. Worldwide studies are demonstrating how meditation helps to reduce stress and teaching children life-long skills can be a way to help them cope with challenges and change.

Lorraine is the author of ‘Calm Kids – help children relax with mindful activities’ which focusses on helping adults teach their kid some basic steps.  She has also written ‘Connected Kids: Help Kids With Special Needs (and Autism) Shine With Mindful, Heartfelt Activities’.

For more information on meditation for children or teens visit www.teachchildrenmeditation.com

What if I told you that your child would experience less anxiety and stress if they learned meditation?  

I know it is a bold claim, but given my past 15 years of teaching meditation and showing others how to teach it, I know it is true.

Children are learning to develop mentally, emotionally and physically as they grow older. However if they experience stress, this can have a large impact on this development and interfere with their normal bodily processes.

We may scoff at the idea that children have any less stress than they did 30 or 40 years ago, but the diet our children eat is different and they are more inactive than in the past with the role of technology.

Just like a dog who shakes it off when they have a moment of stress, our children need to move and shake it off if they experience a moment of stress. Instead, the acute moment of stress can turn into a chronic state and this can impact on anxiety levels and produce sleep issues.

So how does meditation help?

There are many benefits to teaching children meditation. The first is that it can help them feel calmer and more centred and this can help them recover quickly from stress. Technically speaking it helps to build up their resilience and this is a key skill for adult life where the future can be very uncertain.

It can help nourish the brain pre-sleep and this ‘alpha’ state of being relaxed but alert is what our brain requires to move it into a deeper and longer sleep pattern. Meditation is akin to this alpha state and we have witnessed improvements with sleep within 3 to 4 sessions.

It can help with attention and focus issues. If the brain is stressed it is unable to absorb new information so by given the child skills to help them notice stress and then reduce it through the breath or relaxing the body helps the brain function more effectively.

How do I start teaching my child meditation?

First of all, you must start meditation for yourself. There is no point in trying to teach it while your stress levels are sky high. Children feed off our energy and state of mind and if we can’t be grounded for them then they can’t be grounded for us. Like they say in the airplane safety procedures… put your own oxygen mask on first.

This in itself will help you be more mindfully aware and not react to situations provoked by the normal development (tantrums) of children. Plus it can be very helpful if you are not sleeping well either as it can replenish or your energy levels.

Once you have a regular practise, you can start to read or learn about how to teach children meditation. The myth that children can’t learn this is exactly that – a myth. You just need to broaden your horizons when you consider what meditation is.

First of all it may involve mindful movement like yoga as this engages a young person in awareness of their body and helps bring this into balance with the mind and feelings.

Secondly you would want to introduce them to their breath – using tactile ways to help children understand what we mean by the breath and how focussing on the breath can help switch off the stress they are experiencing.

Thirdly we can have fun with meditation. Rather like creative story telling we can take them on a journey in their imagination which may not only help them to recover for unhelpful thoughts and feelings but can help them enjoy moments of pure joy – these thoughts generate a release of important chemicals like oxytocin in the body which is very helpful in reducing stress.

Still unsure your lively child can learn mindfulness?

As an author on the subject and founder of the Connected Kids Programme, I know so.  

It is often easier to teach kids than it is to teach adults as they are more willing to engage in their imagination and we can help them be more mindful of their bodies, their breath and their thoughts to reduce stress.

The idea of teaching children this has become very popular in recent years. Worldwide studies are demonstrating how meditation helps to reduce stress and teaching children life-long skills can be a way to help them cope with challenges and change.

Lorraine is the author of ‘Calm Kids – help children relax with mindful activities’ which focusses on helping adults teach their kid some basic steps.  She has also written ‘Connected Kids: Help Kids With Special Needs (and Autism) Shine With Mindful, Heartfelt Activities’.

For more information on meditation for children or teens visit www.teachchildrenmeditation.com

What if I told you that your child would experience less anxiety and stress if they learned meditation?  

I know it is a bold claim, but given my past 15 years of teaching meditation and showing others how to teach it, I know it is true.

Children are learning to develop mentally, emotionally and physically as they grow older. However if they experience stress, this can have a large impact on this development and interfere with their normal bodily processes.

We may scoff at the idea that children have any less stress than they did 30 or 40 years ago, but the diet our children eat is different and they are more inactive than in the past with the role of technology.

Just like a dog who shakes it off when they have a moment of stress, our children need to move and shake it off if they experience a moment of stress. Instead, the acute moment of stress can turn into a chronic state and this can impact on anxiety levels and produce sleep issues.

So how does meditation help?

There are many benefits to teaching children meditation. The first is that it can help them feel calmer and more centred and this can help them recover quickly from stress. Technically speaking it helps to build up their resilience and this is a key skill for adult life where the future can be very uncertain.

It can help nourish the brain pre-sleep and this ‘alpha’ state of being relaxed but alert is what our brain requires to move it into a deeper and longer sleep pattern. Meditation is akin to this alpha state and we have witnessed improvements with sleep within 3 to 4 sessions.

It can help with attention and focus issues. If the brain is stressed it is unable to absorb new information so by given the child skills to help them notice stress and then reduce it through the breath or relaxing the body helps the brain function more effectively.

How do I start teaching my child meditation?

First of all, you must start meditation for yourself. There is no point in trying to teach it while your stress levels are sky high. Children feed off our energy and state of mind and if we can’t be grounded for them then they can’t be grounded for us. Like they say in the airplane safety procedures… put your own oxygen mask on first.

This in itself will help you be more mindfully aware and not react to situations provoked by the normal development (tantrums) of children. Plus it can be very helpful if you are not sleeping well either as it can replenish or your energy levels.

Once you have a regular practise, you can start to read or learn about how to teach children meditation. The myth that children can’t learn this is exactly that – a myth. You just need to broaden your horizons when you consider what meditation is.

First of all it may involve mindful movement like yoga as this engages a young person in awareness of their body and helps bring this into balance with the mind and feelings.

Secondly you would want to introduce them to their breath – using tactile ways to help children understand what we mean by the breath and how focussing on the breath can help switch off the stress they are experiencing.

Thirdly we can have fun with meditation. Rather like creative story telling we can take them on a journey in their imagination which may not only help them to recover for unhelpful thoughts and feelings but can help them enjoy moments of pure joy – these thoughts generate a release of important chemicals like oxytocin in the body which is very helpful in reducing stress.

Still unsure your lively child can learn mindfulness?

As an author on the subject and founder of the Connected Kids Programme, I know so.  

It is often easier to teach kids than it is to teach adults as they are more willing to engage in their imagination and we can help them be more mindful of their bodies, their breath and their thoughts to reduce stress.

The idea of teaching children this has become very popular in recent years. Worldwide studies are demonstrating how meditation helps to reduce stress and teaching children life-long skills can be a way to help them cope with challenges and change.

Lorraine is the author of ‘Calm Kids – help children relax with mindful activities’ which focusses on helping adults teach their kid some basic steps.  She has also written ‘Connected Kids: Help Kids With Special Needs (and Autism) Shine With Mindful, Heartfelt Activities’.

For more information on meditation for children or teens visit www.teachchildrenmeditation.com

What if I told you that your child would experience less anxiety and stress if they learned meditation?  

I know it is a bold claim, but given my past 15 years of teaching meditation and showing others how to teach it, I know it is true.

Children are learning to develop mentally, emotionally and physically as they grow older. However if they experience stress, this can have a large impact on this development and interfere with their normal bodily processes.

We may scoff at the idea that children have any less stress than they did 30 or 40 years ago, but the diet our children eat is different and they are more inactive than in the past with the role of technology.

Just like a dog who shakes it off when they have a moment of stress, our children need to move and shake it off if they experience a moment of stress. Instead, the acute moment of stress can turn into a chronic state and this can impact on anxiety levels and produce sleep issues.

So how does meditation help?

There are many benefits to teaching children meditation. The first is that it can help them feel calmer and more centred and this can help them recover quickly from stress. Technically speaking it helps to build up their resilience and this is a key skill for adult life where the future can be very uncertain.

It can help nourish the brain pre-sleep and this ‘alpha’ state of being relaxed but alert is what our brain requires to move it into a deeper and longer sleep pattern. Meditation is akin to this alpha state and we have witnessed improvements with sleep within 3 to 4 sessions.

It can help with attention and focus issues. If the brain is stressed it is unable to absorb new information so by given the child skills to help them notice stress and then reduce it through the breath or relaxing the body helps the brain function more effectively.

How do I start teaching my child meditation?

First of all, you must start meditation for yourself. There is no point in trying to teach it while your stress levels are sky high. Children feed off our energy and state of mind and if we can’t be grounded for them then they can’t be grounded for us. Like they say in the airplane safety procedures… put your own oxygen mask on first.

This in itself will help you be more mindfully aware and not react to situations provoked by the normal development (tantrums) of children. Plus it can be very helpful if you are not sleeping well either as it can replenish or your energy levels.

Once you have a regular practise, you can start to read or learn about how to teach children meditation. The myth that children can’t learn this is exactly that – a myth. You just need to broaden your horizons when you consider what meditation is.

First of all it may involve mindful movement like yoga as this engages a young person in awareness of their body and helps bring this into balance with the mind and feelings.

Secondly you would want to introduce them to their breath – using tactile ways to help children understand what we mean by the breath and how focussing on the breath can help switch off the stress they are experiencing.

Thirdly we can have fun with meditation. Rather like creative story telling we can take them on a journey in their imagination which may not only help them to recover for unhelpful thoughts and feelings but can help them enjoy moments of pure joy – these thoughts generate a release of important chemicals like oxytocin in the body which is very helpful in reducing stress.

Still unsure your lively child can learn mindfulness?

As an author on the subject and founder of the Connected Kids Programme, I know so.  

It is often easier to teach kids than it is to teach adults as they are more willing to engage in their imagination and we can help them be more mindful of their bodies, their breath and their thoughts to reduce stress.

The idea of teaching children this has become very popular in recent years. Worldwide studies are demonstrating how meditation helps to reduce stress and teaching children life-long skills can be a way to help them cope with challenges and change.

Lorraine is the author of ‘Calm Kids – help children relax with mindful activities’ which focusses on helping adults teach their kid some basic steps.  She has also written ‘Connected Kids: Help Kids With Special Needs (and Autism) Shine With Mindful, Heartfelt Activities’.

For more information on meditation for children or teens visit www.teachchildrenmeditation.com

What if I told you that your child would experience less anxiety and stress if they learned meditation?  

 

I know it is a bold claim, but given my past 15 years of teaching meditation and showing others how to teach it, I know it is true.

Children are learning to develop mentally, emotionally and physically as they grow older. However if they experience stress, this can have a large impact on this development and interfere with their normal bodily processes.

We may scoff at the idea that children have any less stress than they did 30 or 40 years ago, but the diet our children eat is different and they are more inactive than in the past with the role of technology.

Just like a dog who shakes it off when they have a moment of stress, our children need to move and shake it off if they experience a moment of stress. Instead, the acute moment of stress can turn into a chronic state and this can impact on anxiety levels and produce sleep issues.

So how does meditation help?

There are many benefits to teaching children meditation. The first is that it can help them feel calmer and more centred and this can help them recover quickly from stress. Technically speaking it helps to build up their resilience and this is a key skill for adult life where the future can be very uncertain.

It can help nourish the brain pre-sleep and this ‘alpha’ state of being relaxed but alert is what our brain requires to move it into a deeper and longer sleep pattern. Meditation is akin to this alpha state and we have witnessed improvements with sleep within 3 to 4 sessions.

It can help with attention and focus issues. If the brain is stressed it is unable to absorb new information so by given the child skills to help them notice stress and then reduce it through the breath or relaxing the body helps the brain function more effectively.

How do I start teaching my child meditation?

First of all, you must start meditation for yourself. There is no point in trying to teach it while your stress levels are sky high. Children feed off our energy and state of mind and if we can’t be grounded for them then they can’t be grounded for us. Like they say in the airplane safety procedures… put your own oxygen mask on first.

This in itself will help you be more mindfully aware and not react to situations provoked by the normal development (tantrums) of children. Plus it can be very helpful if you are not sleeping well either as it can replenish or your energy levels.

Once you have a regular practise, you can start to read or learn about how to teach children meditation. The myth that children can’t learn this is exactly that – a myth. You just need to broaden your horizons when you consider what meditation is.

First of all it may involve mindful movement like yoga as this engages a young person in awareness of their body and helps bring this into balance with the mind and feelings.

Secondly you would want to introduce them to their breath – using tactile ways to help children understand what we mean by the breath and how focussing on the breath can help switch off the stress they are experiencing.

Thirdly we can have fun with meditation. Rather like creative story telling we can take them on a journey in their imagination which may not only help them to recover for unhelpful thoughts and feelings but can help them enjoy moments of pure joy – these thoughts generate a release of important chemicals like oxytocin in the body which is very helpful in reducing stress.

Still unsure your lively child can learn mindfulness?

As an author on the subject and founder of the Connected Kids Programme, I know so.  

It is often easier to teach kids than it is to teach adults as they are more willing to engage in their imagination and we can help them be more mindful of their bodies, their breath and their thoughts to reduce stress.

The idea of teaching children this has become very popular in recent years. Worldwide studies are demonstrating how meditation helps to reduce stress and teaching children life-long skills can be a way to help them cope with challenges and change.

Lorraine is the author of ‘Calm Kids – help children relax with mindful activities’ which focusses on helping adults teach their kid some basic steps.  She has also written ‘Connected Kids: Help Kids With Special Needs (and Autism) Shine With Mindful, Heartfelt Activities’.

For more information on meditation for children or teens visit www.teachchildrenmeditation.com

What if I told you that your child would experience less anxiety and stress if they learned meditation?  

I know it is a bold claim, but given my past 15 years of teaching meditation and showing others how to teach it, I know it is true.

Children are learning to develop mentally, emotionally and physically as they grow older. However if they experience stress, this can have a large impact on this development and interfere with their normal bodily processes.

We may scoff at the idea that children have any less stress than they did 30 or 40 years ago, but the diet our children eat is different and they are more inactive than in the past with the role of technology.

Just like a dog who shakes it off when they have a moment of stress, our children need to move and shake it off if they experience a moment of stress. Instead, the acute moment of stress can turn into a chronic state and this can impact on anxiety levels and produce sleep issues.

So how does meditation help?

There are many benefits to teaching children meditation. The first is that it can help them feel calmer and more centred and this can help them recover quickly from stress. Technically speaking it helps to build up their resilience and this is a key skill for adult life where the future can be very uncertain.

It can help nourish the brain pre-sleep and this ‘alpha’ state of being relaxed but alert is what our brain requires to move it into a deeper and longer sleep pattern. Meditation is akin to this alpha state and we have witnessed improvements with sleep within 3 to 4 sessions.

It can help with attention and focus issues. If the brain is stressed it is unable to absorb new information so by given the child skills to help them notice stress and then reduce it through the breath or relaxing the body helps the brain function more effectively.

How do I start teaching my child meditation?

First of all, you must start meditation for yourself. There is no point in trying to teach it while your stress levels are sky high. Children feed off our energy and state of mind and if we can’t be grounded for them then they can’t be grounded for us. Like they say in the airplane safety procedures… put your own oxygen mask on first.

This in itself will help you be more mindfully aware and not react to situations provoked by the normal development (tantrums) of children. Plus it can be very helpful if you are not sleeping well either as it can replenish or your energy levels.

Once you have a regular practise, you can start to read or learn about how to teach children meditation. The myth that children can’t learn this is exactly that – a myth. You just need to broaden your horizons when you consider what meditation is.

First of all it may involve mindful movement like yoga as this engages a young person in awareness of their body and helps bring this into balance with the mind and feelings.

Secondly you would want to introduce them to their breath – using tactile ways to help children understand what we mean by the breath and how focussing on the breath can help switch off the stress they are experiencing.

Thirdly we can have fun with meditation. Rather like creative story telling we can take them on a journey in their imagination which may not only help them to recover for unhelpful thoughts and feelings but can help them enjoy moments of pure joy – these thoughts generate a release of important chemicals like oxytocin in the body which is very helpful in reducing stress.

Still unsure your lively child can learn mindfulness?

As an author on the subject and founder of the Connected Kids Programme, I know so.  

It is often easier to teach kids than it is to teach adults as they are more willing to engage in their imagination and we can help them be more mindful of their bodies, their breath and their thoughts to reduce stress.

The idea of teaching children this has become very popular in recent years. Worldwide studies are demonstrating how meditation helps to reduce stress and teaching children life-long skills can be a way to help them cope with challenges and change.

Lorraine is the author of ‘Calm Kids – help children relax with mindful activities’ which focusses on helping adults teach their kid some basic steps.  She has also written ‘Connected Kids: Help Kids With Special Needs (and Autism) Shine With Mindful, Heartfelt Activities’.

For more information on meditation for children or teens visit www.teachchildrenmeditation.com

What if I told you that your child would experience less anxiety and stress if they learned meditation?  

I know it is a bold claim, but given my past 15 years of teaching meditation and showing others how to teach it, I know it is true.

Children are learning to develop mentally, emotionally and physically as they grow older. However if they experience stress, this can have a large impact on this development and interfere with their normal bodily processes.

We may scoff at the idea that children have any less stress than they did 30 or 40 years ago, but the diet our children eat is different and they are more inactive than in the past with the role of technology.

Just like a dog who shakes it off when they have a moment of stress, our children need to move and shake it off if they experience a moment of stress. Instead, the acute moment of stress can turn into a chronic state and this can impact on anxiety levels and produce sleep issues.

So how does meditation help?

There are many benefits to teaching children meditation. The first is that it can help them feel calmer and more centred and this can help them recover quickly from stress. Technically speaking it helps to build up their resilience and this is a key skill for adult life where the future can be very uncertain.

It can help nourish the brain pre-sleep and this ‘alpha’ state of being relaxed but alert is what our brain requires to move it into a deeper and longer sleep pattern. Meditation is akin to this alpha state and we have witnessed improvements with sleep within 3 to 4 sessions.

It can help with attention and focus issues. If the brain is stressed it is unable to absorb new information so by given the child skills to help them notice stress and then reduce it through the breath or relaxing the body helps the brain function more effectively.

How do I start teaching my child meditation?

First of all, you must start meditation for yourself. There is no point in trying to teach it while your stress levels are sky high. Children feed off our energy and state of mind and if we can’t be grounded for them then they can’t be grounded for us. Like they say in the airplane safety procedures… put your own oxygen mask on first.

This in itself will help you be more mindfully aware and not react to situations provoked by the normal development (tantrums) of children. Plus it can be very helpful if you are not sleeping well either as it can replenish or your energy levels.

Once you have a regular practise, you can start to read or learn about how to teach children meditation. The myth that children can’t learn this is exactly that – a myth. You just need to broaden your horizons when you consider what meditation is.

First of all it may involve mindful movement like yoga as this engages a young person in awareness of their body and helps bring this into balance with the mind and feelings.

Secondly you would want to introduce them to their breath – using tactile ways to help children understand what we mean by the breath and how focussing on the breath can help switch off the stress they are experiencing.

Thirdly we can have fun with meditation. Rather like creative story telling we can take them on a journey in their imagination which may not only help them to recover for unhelpful thoughts and feelings but can help them enjoy moments of pure joy – these thoughts generate a release of important chemicals like oxytocin in the body which is very helpful in reducing stress.

Still unsure your lively child can learn mindfulness?

As an author on the subject and founder of the Connected Kids Programme, I know so.  

It is often easier to teach kids than it is to teach adults as they are more willing to engage in their imagination and we can help them be more mindful of their bodies, their breath and their thoughts to reduce stress.

The idea of teaching children this has become very popular in recent years. Worldwide studies are demonstrating how meditation helps to reduce stress and teaching children life-long skills can be a way to help them cope with challenges and change.

Lorraine is the author of ‘Calm Kids – help children relax with mindful activities’ which focusses on helping adults teach their kid some basic steps.  She has also written ‘Connected Kids: Help Kids With Special Needs (and Autism) Shine With Mindful, Heartfelt Activities’.

For more information on meditation for children or teens visit www.teachchildrenmeditation.com

What if I told you that your child would experience less anxiety and stress if they learned meditation?  

I know it is a bold claim, but given my past 15 years of teaching meditation and showing others how to teach it, I know it is true.

Children are learning to develop mentally, emotionally and physically as they grow older. However if they experience stress, this can have a large impact on this development and interfere with their normal bodily processes.

We may scoff at the idea that children have any less stress than they did 30 or 40 years ago, but the diet our children eat is different and they are more inactive than in the past with the role of technology.

Just like a dog who shakes it off when they have a moment of stress, our children need to move and shake it off if they experience a moment of stress. Instead, the acute moment of stress can turn into a chronic state and this can impact on anxiety levels and produce sleep issues.

So how does meditation help?

There are many benefits to teaching children meditation. The first is that it can help them feel calmer and more centred and this can help them recover quickly from stress. Technically speaking it helps to build up their resilience and this is a key skill for adult life where the future can be very uncertain.

It can help nourish the brain pre-sleep and this ‘alpha’ state of being relaxed but alert is what our brain requires to move it into a deeper and longer sleep pattern. Meditation is akin to this alpha state and we have witnessed improvements with sleep within 3 to 4 sessions.

It can help with attention and focus issues. If the brain is stressed it is unable to absorb new information so by given the child skills to help them notice stress and then reduce it through the breath or relaxing the body helps the brain function more effectively.

How do I start teaching my child meditation?

First of all, you must start meditation for yourself. There is no point in trying to teach it while your stress levels are sky high. Children feed off our energy and state of mind and if we can’t be grounded for them then they can’t be grounded for us. Like they say in the airplane safety procedures… put your own oxygen mask on first.

This in itself will help you be more mindfully aware and not react to situations provoked by the normal development (tantrums) of children. Plus it can be very helpful if you are not sleeping well either as it can replenish or your energy levels.

Once you have a regular practise, you can start to read or learn about how to teach children meditation. The myth that children can’t learn this is exactly that – a myth. You just need to broaden your horizons when you consider what meditation is.

First of all it may involve mindful movement like yoga as this engages a young person in awareness of their body and helps bring this into balance with the mind and feelings.

Secondly you would want to introduce them to their breath – using tactile ways to help children understand what we mean by the breath and how focussing on the breath can help switch off the stress they are experiencing.

Thirdly we can have fun with meditation. Rather like creative story telling we can take them on a journey in their imagination which may not only help them to recover for unhelpful thoughts and feelings but can help them enjoy moments of pure joy – these thoughts generate a release of important chemicals like oxytocin in the body which is very helpful in reducing stress.

Still unsure your lively child can learn mindfulness?

As an author on the subject and founder of the Connected Kids Programme, I know so.  

It is often easier to teach kids than it is to teach adults as they are more willing to engage in their imagination and we can help them be more mindful of their bodies, their breath and their thoughts to reduce stress.

The idea of teaching children this has become very popular in recent years. Worldwide studies are demonstrating how meditation helps to reduce stress and teaching children life-long skills can be a way to help them cope with challenges and change.

Lorraine is the author of ‘Calm Kids – help children relax with mindful activities’ which focusses on helping adults teach their kid some basic steps.  She has also written ‘Connected Kids: Help Kids With Special Needs (and Autism) Shine With Mindful, Heartfelt Activities’.

For more information on meditation for children or teens visit www.teachchildrenmeditation.com

What if I told you that your child would experience less anxiety and stress if they learned meditation?  

 

I know it is a bold claim, but given my past 15 years of teaching meditation and showing others how to teach it, I know it is true.

Children are learning to develop mentally, emotionally and physically as they grow older. However if they experience stress, this can have a large impact on this development and interfere with their normal bodily processes.

We may scoff at the idea that children have any less stress than they did 30 or 40 years ago, but the diet our children eat is different and they are more inactive than in the past with the role of technology.

Just like a dog who shakes it off when they have a moment of stress, our children need to move and shake it off if they experience a moment of stress. Instead, the acute moment of stress can turn into a chronic state and this can impact on anxiety levels and produce sleep issues.

So how does meditation help?

There are many benefits to teaching children meditation. The first is that it can help them feel calmer and more centred and this can help them recover quickly from stress. Technically speaking it helps to build up their resilience and this is a key skill for adult life where the future can be very uncertain.

It can help nourish the brain pre-sleep and this ‘alpha’ state of being relaxed but alert is what our brain requires to move it into a deeper and longer sleep pattern. Meditation is akin to this alpha state and we have witnessed improvements with sleep within 3 to 4 sessions.

It can help with attention and focus issues. If the brain is stressed it is unable to absorb new information so by given the child skills to help them notice stress and then reduce it through the breath or relaxing the body helps the brain function more effectively.

How do I start teaching my child meditation?

First of all, you must start meditation for yourself. There is no point in trying to teach it while your stress levels are sky high. Children feed off our energy and state of mind and if we can’t be grounded for them then they can’t be grounded for us. Like they say in the airplane safety procedures… put your own oxygen mask on first.

This in itself will help you be more mindfully aware and not react to situations provoked by the normal development (tantrums) of children. Plus it can be very helpful if you are not sleeping well either as it can replenish or your energy levels.

Once you have a regular practise, you can start to read or learn about how to teach children meditation. The myth that children can’t learn this is exactly that – a myth. You just need to broaden your horizons when you consider what meditation is.

First of all it may involve mindful movement like yoga as this engages a young person in awareness of their body and helps bring this into balance with the mind and feelings.

Secondly you would want to introduce them to their breath – using tactile ways to help children understand what we mean by the breath and how focussing on the breath can help switch off the stress they are experiencing.

Thirdly we can have fun with meditation. Rather like creative story telling we can take them on a journey in their imagination which may not only help them to recover for unhelpful thoughts and feelings but can help them enjoy moments of pure joy – these thoughts generate a release of important chemicals like oxytocin in the body which is very helpful in reducing stress.

Still unsure your lively child can learn mindfulness?

As an author on the subject and founder of the Connected Kids Programme, I know so.  

It is often easier to teach kids than it is to teach adults as they are more willing to engage in their imagination and we can help them be more mindful of their bodies, their breath and their thoughts to reduce stress.

The idea of teaching children this has become very popular in recent years. Worldwide studies are demonstrating how meditation helps to reduce stress and teaching children life-long skills can be a way to help them cope with challenges and change.

Lorraine is the author of ‘Calm Kids – help children relax with mindful activities’ which focusses on helping adults teach their kid some basic steps.  She has also written ‘Connected Kids: Help Kids With Special Needs (and Autism) Shine With Mindful, Heartfelt Activities’.

For more information on meditation for children or teens visit www.teachchildrenmeditation.com

What if I told you that your child would experience less anxiety and stress if they learned meditation?  

I know it is a bold claim, but given my past 15 years of teaching meditation and showing others how to teach it, I know it is true.

Children are learning to develop mentally, emotionally and physically as they grow older. However if they experience stress, this can have a large impact on this development and interfere with their normal bodily processes.

We may scoff at the idea that children have any less stress than they did 30 or 40 years ago, but the diet our children eat is different and they are more inactive than in the past with the role of technology.

Just like a dog who shakes it off when they have a moment of stress, our children need to move and shake it off if they experience a moment of stress. Instead, the acute moment of stress can turn into a chronic state and this can impact on anxiety levels and produce sleep issues.

So how does meditation help?

There are many benefits to teaching children meditation. The first is that it can help them feel calmer and more centred and this can help them recover quickly from stress. Technically speaking it helps to build up their resilience and this is a key skill for adult life where the future can be very uncertain.

It can help nourish the brain pre-sleep and this ‘alpha’ state of being relaxed but alert is what our brain requires to move it into a deeper and longer sleep pattern. Meditation is akin to this alpha state and we have witnessed improvements with sleep within 3 to 4 sessions.

It can help with attention and focus issues. If the brain is stressed it is unable to absorb new information so by given the child skills to help them notice stress and then reduce it through the breath or relaxing the body helps the brain function more effectively.

How do I start teaching my child meditation?

First of all, you must start meditation for yourself. There is no point in trying to teach it while your stress levels are sky high. Children feed off our energy and state of mind and if we can’t be grounded for them then they can’t be grounded for us. Like they say in the airplane safety procedures… put your own oxygen mask on first.

This in itself will help you be more mindfully aware and not react to situations provoked by the normal development (tantrums) of children. Plus it can be very helpful if you are not sleeping well either as it can replenish or your energy levels.

Once you have a regular practise, you can start to read or learn about how to teach children meditation. The myth that children can’t learn this is exactly that – a myth. You just need to broaden your horizons when you consider what meditation is.

First of all it may involve mindful movement like yoga as this engages a young person in awareness of their body and helps bring this into balance with the mind and feelings.

Secondly you would want to introduce them to their breath – using tactile ways to help children understand what we mean by the breath and how focussing on the breath can help switch off the stress they are experiencing.

Thirdly we can have fun with meditation. Rather like creative story telling we can take them on a journey in their imagination which may not only help them to recover for unhelpful thoughts and feelings but can help them enjoy moments of pure joy – these thoughts generate a release of important chemicals like oxytocin in the body which is very helpful in reducing stress.

Still unsure your lively child can learn mindfulness?

As an author on the subject and founder of the Connected Kids Programme, I know so.  

It is often easier to teach kids than it is to teach adults as they are more willing to engage in their imagination and we can help them be more mindful of their bodies, their breath and their thoughts to reduce stress.

The idea of teaching children this has become very popular in recent years. Worldwide studies are demonstrating how meditation helps to reduce stress and teaching children life-long skills can be a way to help them cope with challenges and change.

Lorraine is the author of ‘Calm Kids – help children relax with mindful activities’ which focusses on helping adults teach their kid some basic steps.  She has also written ‘Connected Kids: Help Kids With Special Needs (and Autism) Shine With Mindful, Heartfelt Activities’.

For more information on meditation for children or teens visit www.teachchildrenmeditation.com

What if I told you that your child would experience less anxiety and stress if they learned meditation?  

I know it is a bold claim, but given my past 15 years of teaching meditation and showing others how to teach it, I know it is true.

Children are learning to develop mentally, emotionally and physically as they grow older. However if they experience stress, this can have a large impact on this development and interfere with their normal bodily processes.

We may scoff at the idea that children have any less stress than they did 30 or 40 years ago, but the diet our children eat is different and they are more inactive than in the past with the role of technology.

Just like a dog who shakes it off when they have a moment of stress, our children need to move and shake it off if they experience a moment of stress. Instead, the acute moment of stress can turn into a chronic state and this can impact on anxiety levels and produce sleep issues.

So how does meditation help?

There are many benefits to teaching children meditation. The first is that it can help them feel calmer and more centred and this can help them recover quickly from stress. Technically speaking it helps to build up their resilience and this is a key skill for adult life where the future can be very uncertain.

It can help nourish the brain pre-sleep and this ‘alpha’ state of being relaxed but alert is what our brain requires to move it into a deeper and longer sleep pattern. Meditation is akin to this alpha state and we have witnessed improvements with sleep within 3 to 4 sessions.

It can help with attention and focus issues. If the brain is stressed it is unable to absorb new information so by given the child skills to help them notice stress and then reduce it through the breath or relaxing the body helps the brain function more effectively.

How do I start teaching my child meditation?

First of all, you must start meditation for yourself. There is no point in trying to teach it while your stress levels are sky high. Children feed off our energy and state of mind and if we can’t be grounded for them then they can’t be grounded for us. Like they say in the airplane safety procedures… put your own oxygen mask on first.

This in itself will help you be more mindfully aware and not react to situations provoked by the normal development (tantrums) of children. Plus it can be very helpful if you are not sleeping well either as it can replenish or your energy levels.

Once you have a regular practise, you can start to read or learn about how to teach children meditation. The myth that children can’t learn this is exactly that – a myth. You just need to broaden your horizons when you consider what meditation is.

First of all it may involve mindful movement like yoga as this engages a young person in awareness of their body and helps bring this into balance with the mind and feelings.

Secondly you would want to introduce them to their breath – using tactile ways to help children understand what we mean by the breath and how focussing on the breath can help switch off the stress they are experiencing.

Thirdly we can have fun with meditation. Rather like creative story telling we can take them on a journey in their imagination which may not only help them to recover for unhelpful thoughts and feelings but can help them enjoy moments of pure joy – these thoughts generate a release of important chemicals like oxytocin in the body which is very helpful in reducing stress.

Still unsure your lively child can learn mindfulness?

As an author on the subject and founder of the Connected Kids Programme, I know so.  

It is often easier to teach kids than it is to teach adults as they are more willing to engage in their imagination and we can help them be more mindful of their bodies, their breath and their thoughts to reduce stress.

The idea of teaching children this has become very popular in recent years. Worldwide studies are demonstrating how meditation helps to reduce stress and teaching children life-long skills can be a way to help them cope with challenges and change.

Lorraine is the author of ‘Calm Kids – help children relax with mindful activities’ which focusses on helping adults teach their kid some basic steps.  She has also written ‘Connected Kids: Help Kids With Special Needs (and Autism) Shine With Mindful, Heartfelt Activities’.

For more information on meditation for children or teens visit www.teachchildrenmeditation.com

What if I told you that your child would experience less anxiety and stress if they learned meditation?  

I know it is a bold claim, but given my past 15 years of teaching meditation and showing others how to teach it, I know it is true.

Children are learning to develop mentally, emotionally and physically as they grow older. However if they experience stress, this can have a large impact on this development and interfere with their normal bodily processes.

We may scoff at the idea that children have any less stress than they did 30 or 40 years ago, but the diet our children eat is different and they are more inactive than in the past with the role of technology.

Just like a dog who shakes it off when they have a moment of stress, our children need to move and shake it off if they experience a moment of stress. Instead, the acute moment of stress can turn into a chronic state and this can impact on anxiety levels and produce sleep issues.

So how does meditation help?

There are many benefits to teaching children meditation. The first is that it can help them feel calmer and more centred and this can help them recover quickly from stress. Technically speaking it helps to build up their resilience and this is a key skill for adult life where the future can be very uncertain.

It can help nourish the brain pre-sleep and this ‘alpha’ state of being relaxed but alert is what our brain requires to move it into a deeper and longer sleep pattern. Meditation is akin to this alpha state and we have witnessed improvements with sleep within 3 to 4 sessions.

It can help with attention and focus issues. If the brain is stressed it is unable to absorb new information so by given the child skills to help them notice stress and then reduce it through the breath or relaxing the body helps the brain function more effectively.

How do I start teaching my child meditation?

First of all, you must start meditation for yourself. There is no point in trying to teach it while your stress levels are sky high. Children feed off our energy and state of mind and if we can’t be grounded for them then they can’t be grounded for us. Like they say in the airplane safety procedures… put your own oxygen mask on first.

This in itself will help you be more mindfully aware and not react to situations provoked by the normal development (tantrums) of children. Plus it can be very helpful if you are not sleeping well either as it can replenish or your energy levels.

Once you have a regular practise, you can start to read or learn about how to teach children meditation. The myth that children can’t learn this is exactly that – a myth. You just need to broaden your horizons when you consider what meditation is.

First of all it may involve mindful movement like yoga as this engages a young person in awareness of their body and helps bring this into balance with the mind and feelings.

Secondly you would want to introduce them to their breath – using tactile ways to help children understand what we mean by the breath and how focussing on the breath can help switch off the stress they are experiencing.

Thirdly we can have fun with meditation. Rather like creative story telling we can take them on a journey in their imagination which may not only help them to recover for unhelpful thoughts and feelings but can help them enjoy moments of pure joy – these thoughts generate a release of important chemicals like oxytocin in the body which is very helpful in reducing stress.

Still unsure your lively child can learn mindfulness?

As an author on the subject and founder of the Connected Kids Programme, I know so.  

It is often easier to teach kids than it is to teach adults as they are more willing to engage in their imagination and we can help them be more mindful of their bodies, their breath and their thoughts to reduce stress.

The idea of teaching children this has become very popular in recent years. Worldwide studies are demonstrating how meditation helps to reduce stress and teaching children life-long skills can be a way to help them cope with challenges and change.

Lorraine is the author of ‘Calm Kids – help children relax with mindful activities’ which focusses on helping adults teach their kid some basic steps.  She has also written ‘Connected Kids: Help Kids With Special Needs (and Autism) Shine With Mindful, Heartfelt Activities’.

For more information on meditation for children or teens visit www.teachchildrenmeditation.com

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